B-Level (Middle Bisquers)

Trophy:  The Adam Trophy donated by A.H.M. Adam.

The trophy for this event was presented by the SCA’s new Chairman, Alasdair Adam, at the prize-giving after the Annual Dinner in 1985.

The B-Level (Middle Bisquers’) Tournament is open to players who have a handicap in the “middle” range usually between 3 and 10 (though players with handicaps above 10 are not excluded).  It is an excellent opportunity for improving players to test themselves where no bisques are available.  Played under advanced rules.

Roll of honour:

 

Winner

Handicap

1984       

Phillip Simpson

1985       

John Surgenor

1986       

Malcolm Smith

1987       

Corla van Griethuysen

1988       

Fred Mann

1989       

Colin Rogers

1990       

Colin Rogers

1991       

David Warhurst

1992       

Alistair Hunter

5

1993       

Corla van Griethuysen

4

1994       

Dave Farmer

5

1995       

Andy Campbell

1996       

not played

 

1997       

not played

 

1998       

Jamieson Walker

10

1999       

David Appleton

2000       

David Appleton

4

2001       

Stuart McKendrick

2002       

Tony Brightman

6

2003       

Graham Brooks

9

2004       

Tony Foster

3

2005       

Campbell Morrison

7

2006       

David Appleton

4

2007       

David Appleton

3

2008       

Campbell Morrison

2009       

Alan Wilson

4 (3½)

2010       

not played

 

2011       

Alan Wilson

3

2012       

Alan Wilson

3

 

 

Reports:

1983/4:

The only report found so far is in Bulletin No. 30, September 1986, couched in a plea for information.  At the first attempt to play the Middle Bisquers’ in 1983, blocks were played in Glasgow and Edinburgh.  Phillip Simpson and Jimmy Rowe were the respective winners.  Also involved in Edinburgh were Malcolm Smith, Vera Macpherson and Margaret Lauder.  Can anyone remember these games, and, most importantly, can anyone remember the final being played early in 1984?  Phillip Simpson won.

25 August, 1985, Glasgow Green:

After the previous diverse dates, format fiddling and personnel permutating, a date was named and six ‘keen young hopefuls’ gathered at Glasgow Green in the early morning of 25 August.  Whereas the Chairman’s Rosebowl, essentially for ‘A’-class players, has a fixed and successful format, the middle bisquers’ equivalent has neither trophy nor a fixed format.  The players this year were, however, all enthusiastic about the ‘three games in a day for each player in a block’ as the basic unit for the tournament – although with a larger entry, preliminary blocks would be held in June with the final on the same date as this year.

As six players turned up on the day, we played a version of the short-robin; this had the advantage of ensuring three games each, but the potential disadvantage that a play-off for the winner might be required.  The players were John Surgenor (4½), Malcolm Smith (5½), Allan Ramsay (6), Phillip Simpson (6½), Corla van Griethuysen (6½) and Dave Warhurst (7).  Play was by advanced rules.

In the first round, John gave warning that he would be hard to beat, winning by 17 in ‘A’-class style after two very good breaks; both were picked up despite Malcolm leaving defensive wide joins on the boundary.  Corla won easily against Phillip +15, but Dave won +1T only after a long close struggle with Allan.  The second round saw John and Dave still in good form winning +13 and +17 against Allan and Phillip respectively, while Malcolm just managed to beat Corla +6.

John was now indomitable, beating Corla +20 although she herself was playing well after a successful week at the Edinburgh Tournament.  Allan beat Phillip +13, leaving Dave’s game against Malcolm as the centre of attention, since, if Dave lost, John would be the outright winner.  At this point Malcolm had taken a break right round to rover, conceding the contact.  Dave then played an excellent break from hoop 3 to the peg, peeling and pegging Malcolm’s ball out in the process – both other balls were for hoop 3.  Despite the advantage of two balls, Dave’s progress was slow as Malcolm was continuously hitting in.  However, once Dave reached penultimate, he pegged the other ball out.  This sound tactic failed as Malcolm continued to hit in, make a hoop, and send Dave’s ball to the further reaches and set up for the next hoop.  With his eye now well in for these single ball shots, he was making no mistakes.  The end came when Dave managed to make rover and retired some ten yards from the peg.  Malcolm made penultimate and approached rover to within ten inches.  This proved a grave error as it allowed Dave to roll up to the peg – Malcolm was too close to rover to turn round and shoot, and after running rover he was wired.  The jump shot missed, and Dave won by +1.

This left Dave and John, on three wins each, to play off.  John continued his ‘A’-class play and now holds the Middle Bisquers’ Trophy with a strong recommendation that, by his consistent first-class play, he has promoted himself out of this event!

It is a pleasure to add to this report that there now is a trophy for this event; it was presented by our new Chairman, Alasdair Adam, at the prize-giving after the Annual Dinner.

1986:

Two qualifying blocks of four players were played on 22 June, one at Lauriston Castle and one at Glasgow Green.  Play was at advanced level as this tournament aspires to help the now fairly numerous ‘B’-class players to improve their grasp of ‘A’-class tactics.

In Glasgow the early shock was Drew Nisbet’s defeat of George Anderson, proving, as we have seen several times this season, a handicap difference of 5 or 6 can be overcome.  Malcolm Smith scraped home with some luck +5 against Campbell Smith.  In his second game Drew tired and Malcolm won fairly comfortably, but Drew rallied in his final game to beat Campbell.  Thus Drew’s qualification for the finals depended on Malcolm beating George Anderson.  As always, they had a tense and close game, with, on this occasion, the luck falling to Malcolm who won by +4.  Thus Malcolm and Drew qualified.

In Edinburgh most of the games were also close.  In particular it was reported that Vera Macpherson was involved in some very close finishes, but fortune was not with her and she lost them all.  Fred Mann was also eliminated so Dave Warhurst and Corla van Griethuysen qualified.

The final block was played at Glasgow on 10 August, and the mood was set by the first two games.  Both were very close, with Malcolm Smith and Dave Warhurst the eventual winners, +4 in each case.

The effect of this tension was obvious in the next round as play was a mix of good attacking periods interspersed with almost incomprehensible blunders.  Malcolm’s came after he had built a useful lead against Corla van Griethuysen.  He was for rover and peg and, approaching rover, deliberately left his partner ball just to the side of the hoop in preparation for the peg out.  He scored rover and then carefully rushed the partner ball straight onto the peg!  Corla seized her chance, and in three turns was for rover and peg herself.  She scored rover, and then, mindful of Malcolm’s calamity, simply roqueted her ball halfway to the boundary line.  She then intended simply to roll up to the peg, leaving Malcolm one last long shot.  But then her moment of madness struck – she over-hit the roll putting the forward ball almost to penultimate, but she still pegged out the other.  This gave Malcolm another last chance, and he rolled up about three yards the other side of the peg.  This put the pressure on Corla to hit – she played a hard shot, missed the peg and disappeared into the distance.  Malcolm could then afford a soft shot at the peg, which he hit to win a thrilling finish +1.

Much the same story of misadventure was seen on the other lawn in a tight end-game.  Dave Warhurst was stuck in rover beside Drew’s balls.  Drew was for penultimate and peg, and seeing a simple winning chance, he confidently walked onto the lawn: then came his brainstorm as he played Dave’s black through rover!  This fault allowed Dave to score rover and peg out Drew’s passive rover ball.  In the cat-and-mouse game that followed, Dave crept round the hoops leaving as little peeping round the wires as possible.  Drew kept hitting at these small and distant targets rather than trying to approach his hoop, and this was perhaps his undoing as Dave eventually won by +3.

In what was now effectively the final, Malcolm Smith quickly built up a strong lead, and Dave Warhurst, seemingly drained by his previous drawn-out finish, could not produce his usual hitting form.  Malcolm won by +15, the widest score of the whole tournament.  The other game produced another tight finish, but still Drew Nisbet could not turn his opportunities into a victory; Corla van Griethuysen won by +5.

Congratulations to Malcolm, the second winner of the Adam Trophy, previously won in 1985 by John Surgenor.  But is he really the third?  At the first attempt to play the Middle Bisquers’ in 1983, blocks were played in Glasgow and Edinburgh.  Phillip Simpson and Jimmy Rowe were the respective winners.  Also involved in Edinburgh were Malcolm Smith, Vera Macpherson and Margaret Lauder.  Can anyone remember these games, and, most importantly, can anyone remember the final being played early in 1984?

1987:

No report has been found.  Corla van Griethuysen won.

1988:

All six competitors came from the Edinburgh Club to play in this year’s Middle Bisquers’ at Bush and Edinburgh on 18th and 19th June.  Indeed, apart for the replacement of Jim Lomax by Martin Gill, it was the same group who had made up the middle block at the Spring Tournament at Gleneagles.  Martin, however, had shed 4½ bisques in these five weeks.

At Bush on the Saturday, Martin made an immediate impact by slaughtering Donald Lamont, often slow to get into his stride, while Carol Rowe and Fred Mann recorded comfortable wins.  Martin and Fred each won their other two matches that day to emerge as joint overnight leaders.

Back on the slower Edinburgh lawn on Sunday, Martin continued on his impressive way while Fred just got the better of Carol, who played beautifully in patches but did not achieve consistency.  So Martin and Fred’s meeting was the decider.

Martin started with a menacing break but clanged hoop 5: Fred replied competently but failed to get into position at hoop 4.  After an hour or so of fencing, Martin, on hoops 5 and 6, was a couple ahead, but Fred now took control and advanced to rover and 4-back, with Martin stuck, unable to hit in.  Fred now missed a short lift, and the whole complexion of the game changed. Martin steamed ahead, Fred just missing a whole serious of shots from 3-back at Martin who was unable to get position at 2-back.

On rover and peg, Martin ran his last hoop on his own ball but could not rush near enough to be sure of the peg out from five yards: he split Fred up, but left a reasonable target and Fred at last hit in.  Now he in turn reached peg and peg, but a weak rush left from five yards away; sorely tempted to try the peg out, he changed his mind – and not only took off short to Martin on the north boundary, but hit a double banked ball.  He managed to hit the four-yard shot, but croqueted Martin’s second ball against a hoop, leaving Martin a twelve-yarder to save the game.  He missed, and Fred won an exciting game by +2.

It was a good weekend, with perhaps most games going by the form book.  Martin undoubtedly played the best croquet throughout, making all round breaks with a consistency and confidence which none of the others could match: he was rather unlucky not to win but just could not get the innings during a vital hour against Fred.  Mary Fotheringham was not at her best but Donald was as tenacious as ever, and the Rowes once again showed class in too-rare flashes.  Generally speaking, however, too many four ball breaks withered before flowering.

16 September 1989 at Bush:

In the afternoon of this year’s Finals Day, the final of the Middle Bisquers’ took place between Colin Rogers and Ralph Pirrie; this was eventually won by Colin +2 on time.

7 May, 1990 at Glasgow:

‘Hats Off to Colin’

(by Fred Mann)

Middle Bisquers’ day dawned on the 7th May
And on Glasgow Green East there assembled to play
(Crowds lined their approach, Orange bands played a welcome)
David Warhurst, Fred Mann, Colin Rogers and Malcolm

O’Connell.  Dave was nursing a cold in the head,
But though Rigalled (twice) narrowly beat his man (Fred).
Malcolm thought his best tactic was all-out attack
And played a three ball break right round to 4-back.
(This was in the third turn, ere his foe played fourth ball in,
But the end of their game found the victor was Colin.)

There was lots of good croquet, with never a ripple
Of discord.  Malcolm yearned to complete a triple,
He did the three peels against David Warhurst,
But in running through rover he hit his partner ball first.

So hats off to Colin, who’s won two years running –
The reward of sound technique, cool nerve and much cunning.
The rest didn’t grudge him the triumph he savoured,
For he won all his games.  Runner-up?  It was David.

1991:

No report has been found.  Winner: David Warhurst.

16 – 17 May, 1992 at Bush:

(Report by Rod Williams)

This competition is played under advanced rules, and provides an opportunity for some people who play predominantly handicap games to get to grips with lifts and contacts.  Although this caused some unnecessarily defensive play around lift hoops, there were a few good breaks to 4-back with controlled leaves.  Mostly however, the fast lawns, tight hoops and Barlow ball contributed to numerous errors with the result that six of the ten games went to the three hour time limit.

Alastair Hunter, the pre-match favourite, dropped an early game to Bruce Rannie (by one on time) and came close to losing to Dave Farmer, who stuck in rover while all set to go out; but then Alastair took control and played soundly to steal that game, giving Dave very few chances.  Alastair finished with a resounding +21 win over Dave Rothwell and the competition ended in handicap order, though Andy Campbell, who lost only to Alastair, also won three of his four games.  Both Bruce Rannie and Dave Farmer played some good croquet against stronger opposition and it won’t be long before the new automatic handicapping system brings their handicaps down.

22 – 23 May, 1993 at Bush:

(Report by ‘Unlucky Ronnie’ – also known as ‘Unlucky Bruce from Tyneside’)

‘Unlucky Ronnie from Tayside’

The Glasgow Herald summed up the weekend perfectly, with an action picture of ‘Old Croquet’ (although now with pirate patch), and a full and accurate report of the 1993 Middles Bisquers tournament, at which Corla van Griethuysen won the Adam Trophy for the second time.

‘Ronnie’ was asked late on to ‘write up’ the event, and therefore pungent quotations and live match reports are few, but the competition was keen and entertaining, even for the photographer, and the croquet was of a good standard also.  Six players took part, with six rounds being organized – Match Referee Corla had a seventh organized, but Middle Bisquers are not that speedy round a level advanced court!  Each played the others once, with a second tussle in round six being partly seeded.

The handicap levels ranged from 4 to 12, and the results largely followed that sequence, although some ties beat the odds as can be seen.  Minor placings were decided on ‘who beat whom’, where the first round timed win for ‘Old Croquet’ (Allan Ramsay) over ‘Unlucky Ronnie from Tayside’ made all the difference.

Corla (4) beat Dave +14, Steve +8, Allan +15, Bruce +14 and Fred +6, before losing to Bruce -9 after the trophy was won.  Allan (7) beat Bruce +3T, Steve +12, Dave +26 and Fred +14; Bruce (6) beat Dave +19, Fred +5, Steve +16 and Corla +9; Steve Barnett (8) beat Fred +15, Dave +4 and again +12 in the sixth round; Fred Mann (5) beat Allan +8 and Dave +10T; Dave McLaughlin (12) lost all his games but five of the six ties were close enough to encourage his continuing in this advanced mode.

1994:

No report has been found.  Dave Farmer won with six wins.

22 – 23 July, 1995 at Bush:

(Report by Andy Campbell)

A beautiful day greeted the contestants, handicaps ranging from 4½ to 11, at Bush.  An entry of six meant that we played each other once, with 3½ hour time limits (nice fat limits, but still six games out of the fifteen did not make it).  Saturday saw the shorts and (my) bare feet, while Sunday was wellies and waterproofs.  As usual, when it wasn’t raining, Fred had his head buried in crossword puzzles, and Su (even when it was raining) was chain smoking.  Tony produced probably the best turn of the weekend, snatching a plus one on time victory over Su by hitting in after time had been called.

Despite the spread of handicaps there were many close games: twelve of the fifteen had ten points difference or fewer.  However by Sunday lunch-time, with four rounds played, the winner was already determined.  He was helped by the exciting finish to Brian and Charlotte’s game which saw Brian hit a long shot after time to grab a +1T win.  This left yours truly unbeatable – thanks, Brian!  As the weather was brightening up, we decided to play the final round – and got drenched!  Charlotte beat me in the final round so Brian’s hit in had been crucial.  Thanks to Mona for coffee, George for the lawns, and Charlotte for managing.

1996:

No tournament.  Only Jamieson Walker entered.

1997:

No tournament.  Only Jamieson Walker entered.

1 – 2 August, 1998 at Bush:

(Report by Tony Foster)

Even though only four of us gathered for the Middle Bisquers at Bush, this was a 300% increase on the previous two years when the event attracted only one entrant – Jamieson Walker.  After the first two rounds of matches, it soon became clear why Jamieson was so keen for the event to take place.  Against both Stuart McKendrick and Tony Foster, he started well – in both cases going to penult on the fifth turn – before managing to win closely fought victories.  The prospect of winning the event outright after the round robin proved too much, however.  He was never ahead in the last game of day one, which was won by Campbell Morrison who pegged out after time had been called.

Those readers familiar with Advanced Rules will know that by running 1-back and 4-back before his partner ball had even run hoop 1 meant that Jamieson conceded contact to his opponent. Indeed, he was not alone in employing this tactic rather than the more conventional one of stopping on 4-back and trying to set up a complicated leave.  In most cases, the leaves any of us did manage to make were not to be found in any textbook, but, despite this the standard of play was generally very good, with only one game going to time.

The highlight of Sunday’s final was a dogged fight back by Jamieson.  Tony looked well set to win the match, but clanged 3-back after trying to set up yellow for the rover peel he needed to ensure victory.  Jamieson was a worthy winner of the tournament and, playing off a handicap of 10 (compared to the rest of us on 9, 7 and 6), did so in defiance of the odds.  Hopefully next year’s tournament will attract a bigger field, but one thing you can be sure of is that Jamieson’s entry is already in the post.

31 July – 1 August, 1999 at Bush:

(Report by David Appleton)

This year ‘middle bisquers’ meant those with handicaps between 4½ and 9, separating to some extent into two group: those off 4½ or 5 (Appleton, Caldwell, McKendrick and Foster) and those off 8 or 9 (Anderson, Walker, Morrison and McInnes).  Since all the players lived in the east, the venue had been switched from the advertised Kelvingrove to Bush.  On the Sunday there was a lot of croquet played there, as there were four short lawns being used for golf croquet by a large and merry group of curlers from Penicuik.

It was good to have eight players competing for the Adam Trophy after a few years of low entries.  The format was all-play-all, though in the event two games pegged down on the Saturday evening, the results of which did not affect the main outcome, were left unfinished when the Sunday afternoon sunshine suddenly disappeared in a torrential rainstorm.

The standard of play (at least on the main lawns – I cannot answer for the golf croquet) was quite satisfactory, with many good breaks and some competent leaves.  Peels were harder to come by and there was only one genuine attempt at a triple, which came to grief with the clips on penult and penult.  Of the 15 games involving one of the lower bisquers and one of the higher, three went against the odds, Campbell Morrison beating Geoff Caldwell and Tony Foster, in spite of playing with a borrowed mallet, airport security in Geneva having confiscated his own.

There were several close games, eight of the 26 completed being won by three points or fewer.  Nine went to the time limit of 2½ hours.  David Appleton, showing something like his form of about five years ago, took the trophy with the loss of only one game: that by 26-25 to Geoff Caldwell who pegged him out to leave peg against hoop 6 and 4-back.  That was always going to be close and Geoff took it when David failed to hit the peg through rover.  However a win in the last round against Tony Foster, who hit quite remarkably straight all weekend, sealed the result for David, who has now collected the Summer Weekend Quaich, the reallocated Secretary Trophy and the Adam Trophy within the space of 23 days and who has got his handicap back down to 4.

6 – 7 May, 2000 at Bush:

(Report by David Appleton)

Four of last year’s participants returned to Bush to contest the Middle Bisquers Tournament: David Appleton, Campbell Morrison, Jamieson Walker and Fergus McInnes.  They were joined by Tony Brightman, Fred Mann and John Seddon.  The intention was to play a full block, and in the event, only one game was not played: that between Fred and Tony.

Both days were fine; on the Saturday there was a wind which was slightly chilly if sitting out, but after the mist cleared on the Sunday, the weather was well nigh perfect for croquet.  The lawns however, being very mossy in places, were slow and the hoops were tight.

Time limits of 2½ hours were used and seven of the 20 games reached time, sometimes with exciting endings.  Both Jamieson and Fergus managed to win by a single point, Fergus providing the climax of the weekend when he made six hoops after time was called, for his narrow victory over John.  This was particularly creditable as he waited for some time before running one hoop to let the double bankers through, as time had not yet been called in their game.

Modesty ought to prevent me from saying that David played the best turn of the weekend, a fairly well controlled triple peel against Fergus, but Jamieson had his moments too, playing extravagant two and three ball breaks as a regular feature.  Everyone tried to play very positively; Campbell was perhaps best at deciding against the almost impossible pick-up in favour of a good leave, from which he could launch a better attack in the next turn (see below).  Tony, sadly lacking in practice, played rather like Rossini’s description of Wagner’s music: ‘lovely moments but awful quarters of an hour’.  Fred sometimes looked very much in control and sometimes not, and John was unlucky not to win a game, getting within three hoops of Tony as well as being on the receiving end of Fergus’ final adrenalin rush, and getting closer to the winner than anyone else.

The average winning margin was 11 (8 if you exclude David’s games) which shows a tight competition.  David retained the Adam trophy, however, by winning all his games.  Second place was shared by Campbell and Jamieson; interestingly they cannot be definitively separated because of the lack of a result between Fred and Tony!  If you don’t understand why, then apply the method of tie-breaking which is to credit each player in the tie with the number of wins of players he beat minus the number of losses by players who defeated him.

30 June 2001:

This report is already on the website.

13 – 16 June, 2002 at Meadows West:

(Report by Fergus McInnes)

Last year the Middle Bisquers Tournament got finished in a single day despite having five players and going to a tie break.  This year, with only four players, it started on Thursday evening and was not finished until well after 6:00 p.m. on Sunday.  Several factors contributed:

  • The first game was played on Thursday because of Jamieson’s limited availability on Saturday
  • The hoops, newly set, were unforgiving, while the good quality and easy pace of the lawns made for plenty of long hit-ins.  This made most of the games highly interactive, with many changes of turn and substantial scores by both players, and consequently long in duration
  • The manager, feeling that it would be too dull just to play a standard American block, had devised an extended format in which extra games would be played, depending on the results in the block, to ensure that no one was eliminated on losing a single game (he ended up falling victim to his own format)

As it turned out, three block games, spread out from Thursday evening to Sunday morning, left Fergus McInnes with three wins out of three, Tony Brightman with two, Jamieson Walker with one and Geoff Caldwell with none.  This meant that Fergus had to play Tony again until one of them had two losses – effectively converting their block game into a best of three match.  Fergus had won that game +3, aided by a decision in his favour on a doubtful thin take off, and after pegging out one of Tony’s balls.  In the second game he adopted the pegging out tactic again, mainly as a pre-emptive measure after Tony had attempted to do the same to him, and left Tony on rover against hoop 5 and peg; Tony hit in from corner to corner, but then failed rover; Fergus struggled through four hoops in separate turns before succumbing to another hit in.  The last game was the only one in the tournament to have a net score in double figures, Tony winning +21 to reverse the block result and claim the trophy.  This game too had its interesting moments, notably when Fergus’s split approach from the south boundary to a pioneer at hoop 4 put his ball just through the hoop from behind and the croqueted ball in the jaws of hoop 5; from this position running hoop 4 was easy, but the ball to the north of it could not be roqueted, and although he hit and peeled Tony’s ball in hoop 5 he then failed to run it himself after taking off to an angled position.

The tournament featured a few good breaks and some recognisable approximations to diagonal spread leaves, but little peeling.  Tony did finish the last game in style, though, with a rover peel and peg out, including a successful jump shot and bombardment of the peelee.  On this form his handicap reduction to 5 at the end of the event was well deserved.

2003:

No report has been found.  Winner: Graham Brooks (on points, after all four players won three games).

2004:

This report is already on the website.

2005:

This report is already on the website.

2006:

This report is already on the website.

2007:

This report is already on the website.

2008

This report is already on the website.

2009:

This report is already on the website.

2010: 

No tournament.  Too few entries.

2011:

This report is already on the website.

2012:

This report is already on the website.

 

 

Results:

1984:    No records have been found
Final:
Phillip Simpson beat Jimmy Rowe

1985:     John Surgenor (3 wins) beat Malcolm Smith +17, Allan Ramsay +13, Corla van Griethuysen +20
David Warhurst (3 wins) beat Allan Ramsay +1T, Phillip Simpson +17, Malcolm Smith +1
Corla van Griethuysen (1 win) beat Phillip Simpson +15
Malcolm Smith (1 win) beat Corla van Griethuysen +6
Allan Ramsay (1 win) beat Phillip Simpson +13
Phillip Simpson (0 wins)
Final:
John Surgenor beat David Warhurst

1986:    Glasgow Block (22 June):
Malcolm Smith beat Campbell Smith +5, Andrew Nisbet, George Anderson +4
Andrew Nisbet beat George Anderson, Campbell Smith
George Anderson beat Campbell Smith
Campbell Smith 0 wins
Edinburgh Block (22 June):
Dave Warhurst beat Corla van Griethuysen, Fred Mann, Vera Macpherson
Corla van Griethuysen beat Fred Mann, Vera Macpherson
Fred Mann beat Vera Macpherson
Vera Macpherson 0 wins
Final Block (Glasgow, 10 August):
Malcolm Smith beat Andrew Nisbet +4, Corla van Griethuysen +1, David Warhurst +15
David Warhurst beat Corla van Griethuysen +4, Andrew Nisbet +3
Corla van Griethuysen beat Andrew Nisbet +5
Andrew Nisbet 0 wins

1987:     No records have been found
Winner:
Corla van Griethuysen

1988:    Fred Mann (5 wins) beat Martin Gill +2, Carol Rowe +11, Donald Lamont +11, Jimmy Rowe +14, Mary Fotheringham +18
Martin Gill (4 wins) beat Mary Fotheringham +19, Carol Rowe +11, Donald Lamont +23, Jimmy Rowe +12
Donald Lamont (2 wins) beat Carol Rowe +4T, Mary Fotheringham +2
Carol Rowe (1 win) beat Jimmy Rowe +15
Jimmy Rowe (1 win) beat Donald Lamont +7T
Mary Fotheringham (1 win) beat Carol Rowe +12T

1989:    Block A: Ralph Pirrie beat Fred Mann +15
David Warhurst beat Ralph Pirrie +8T
Fred Mann beat David Warhurst +4T
(Ralph Pirrie qualified on points)
Block B: Colin Rogers beat Malcolm Smith +9, Malcolm O’Connell +21T
Malcolm O’Connell beat Malcolm Smith +12
Final:  Colin Rogers beat Ralph Pirrie +2T

1990:    Colin Rogers beat David Warhurst +10, +12, Malcolm O’Connell +14, +7, Fred Mann +4T
David Warhurst beat Malcolm O’Connell +5, +7, Fred Mann +3, +4
Malcolm O’Connell beat Fred Mann +6, +15

1991:     No records have been found
Winner:
David Warhurst

1992:     Alistair Hunter beat David Rothwell +21, Andy Campbell +8T, Dave Farmer +3T
Andy Campbell beat David Rothwell +9T, Dave Farmer +12T, Bruce Rannie +9
Bruce Rannie beat Alistair Hunter +1T, Dave Farmer +16
David Rothwell beat Bruce Rannie +3T
Dave Farmer beat David Rothwell +1T

1993:     Corla van Griethuysen (h’cap 4, 5 wins) beat Dave McLaughlin +14, Steve Barnett +8, Allan Ramsay +15, Bruce Rannie +14, Fred Mann +6
Allan Ramsay (7, 4) beat Bruce Rannie +3T, Steve Barnett +12, Dave McLaughlin +26, Fred Mann +14
Bruce Rannie (6, 4) beat Dave McLaughlin +19, Fred Mann +5, Steve Barnett +16, Corla van Griethuysen +9
Steve Barnett (8, 3) beat Fred Mann +15, Dave McLaughlin +4T, Dave McLaughlin +12
Fred Mann (5, 2) beat Allan Ramsay +8, Dave McLaughlin +10T
Dave McLaughlin (12, 0)

1994:     Dave Farmer (6 wins) beat Corla van Griethuysen +20, Fred Mann +16, Allan Ramsay +25, Dave McLaughlin +15, Colin Dinwoodie +8, +14
Colin Dinwoodie (5) beat Corla van Griethuysen +3, Fred Mann +23, Allan Ramsay +25, Dave Farmer +13, Dave McLaughlin +23
Corla van Griethuysen (5) beat Fred Mann +17, Allan Ramsay +9, +20, Dave McLaughlin +11, +24
Allan Ramsay (2) beat Dave McLaughlin +1T, Fred Mann +14
Fred Mann (1) beat Allan Ramsay +5
Dave McLaughlin (1) beat Fred Mann +19

1995:     Andy Campbell (4 wins/5) beat Sue Stenhouse +22, Fred Mann +9, Brian Murdoch +10, Tony Foster +16
Tony Foster (3) beat Brian Murdoch +5T, Fred Mann +12, Su Stenhouse +1T
Brian Murdoch (3) beat Su Stenhouse +2T, Charlotte Townsend +1T, Fred Mann +15
Charlotte Townsend (3) beat Tony Foster +8, Su Stenhouse +7, Andy Campbell +4T
Fred Mann (1) beat Charlotte Townsend +5
Su Stenhouse (1) beat Fred Mann +2T

1996:     No tournament

1997:     No tournament

1998:

 

JW

TF

SM

CM

Wins

J. Walker

 

+3T

+6

-9

2

T. Foster

-3T

 

+8

+14

2

S. McKendrick

-6

-8

 

+24

1

C. Morrison

+9

-14

-24

 

1

              Final:           
Jamieson Walker beat Tony Foster +4
3rd place:      
Stuart McKendrick beat Campbell Morrison +13

1999:

 

DA

SM

TF

CM

GC

JW

GA

FM

Wins

D. Appleton

 

+19

+13

+21

-1

+24

+10

+24

6

S. McKendrick

-19

 

+9

 

+3

-1T

+1T

+20

4

T. Foster

-13

-9

 

-15T

+12

+8

+12

+8

4

C. Morrison

-21

 

+15T

 

+7

+2T

+1T

-2T

4

G. Caldwell

+1

-3

-12

-7

 

+17

 

+21

3

J. Walker

-24

+1T

-8

-2T

-17

 

+5T

+4T

3

G. Anderson

-10

-1T

-12

-1T

 

-5T

 

+2T

1

F. McInnes

-24

-20

-8

+2T

-21

-4T

-2T

 

1

2000:

 

DA

CM

JW

FMa

AB

FMc

JS

Wins

D. Appleton

 

+15

+17

+10

+21

+24TP

+9

6

C. Morrison

-15

 

-1T

+8T

+2

+4

+13

4

J. Walker

-17

+1T

 

-13

+8

+14

+9T

4

F. Mann

-10

-8T

+13

 

 

-3T

+25

2

A. Brightman

-21

-2

-8

 

 

+13T

+3T

2

F. McInnes

-24

-4

-14

+3T

-13T

 

+1T

2

J. Seddon

-9

-13

-9T

-25

-3T

-1T

 

0

2001:

 

SM

JW

FM

NG

TF

Wins

Stuart McKendrick

 

-15

+24

+26

+4

3

Jamieson Walker

+15

 

+4

-4

+20

3

Fergus McInnes

-24

-4

 

+26

+12

2

Nigel Gardner

-26

+4

-26

 

+25

2

Tony Foster

-4

-20

-12

-25

 

0

              Final: 
Stuart McKendrick beat Jamieson Walker +14

2002:

 

FM

TB

JW

GC

Wins

Fergus McInnes

 

+3

+4

+8

3

Tony Brightman

-3

 

+4

+5

2

Jamieson Walker

-4

-4

 

+9

1

Geoff Caldwell

-8

-5

-9

 

0

              Final (extra games, completing best-of-three): 
Tony Brightman beat Fergus McInnes +6, +21

2003:

 

GB

JW

GC

FM

Wins

Points

Graham Brooks

 

+14, +14

-17, +16

-11, -2T

3

+14

Jamieson Walker

-14, -14

 

-3, +3

+17, +9

3

-2

Geoff Caldwell

+17, -16

+3, -3

 

-5, +1

3

-3

Fergus McInnes

+11, +2T

-17, -9

+5, -1

 

3

-9

              Winner on points: 
Graham Brooks

2004:     Winner: Tony Foster (7/8) beat Campbell Thomson +17, Allan Hawke +18, Fergus McInnes +24, David Appleton +11, Graham Brooks +14, Jamieson Walker +22, Robert Lay +14
Fergus McInnes (6/7) beat Graham Brooks +1t (22-21), Jamieson Walker +9, Geoff Caldwell +12, David Appleton +17, Allan Hawke +12, Campbell Thomson +22
David Appleton (6/8) beat Duncan Reeves +20, Robert Lay +16, Geoff Caldwell +17, Campbell Thomson +24, Jamieson Walker +19, Graham Brooks +17
Geoff Caldwell (5/7) beat Allan Hawke +24, Tony Foster +4, Robert Lay +22, Graham Brooks +12, Jamieson Walker (conceded at 19-9)
Graham Brooks (3/7) beat Duncan Reeves +9T (22-13), Robert Lay +15, Allan Hawke +2
Robert Lay (2/6) beat Jamieson Walker +3T (19-16), Duncan Reeves +17T (22-5)
Jamieson Walker (2/7) beat Campbell Thomson +15, Allan Hawke +22
Allan Hawke (2/7) beat Campbell Thomson +20, Duncan Reeves +17 
Duncan Reeves (1/5) beat Campbell Thomson +1T (16-15)
Campbell Thomson (0/6)

2005:     Campbell Morrison (6/8) beat Martin Stephenson +26, +23, Jamieson Walker +16, +18, Alice Fleck +26, Ian Wright +26
Martin Stephenson (4/8) beat Jamieson Walker +23, Alice Fleck +22, Ian Wright +13T (23-10), +15
Jamieson Walker (2/8) beat Alice Fleck +3, +22
Alice Fleck (1/8) beat Ian Wright +19
Ian Wright (1/8) beat Jamieson Walker +1T (24-23)

2006:     David Appleton (5) beat Allan Hawke +23, Joe Lennon +13, Martin Stephenson +22tp, Robert Lay +23 (semi-final), Jamieson Walker +19 (final)
Jamieson Walker (3) beat James Hopgood +6T, Robert Lay +4, Allan Hawke +11 (semi-final)
Allan Hawke (3) beat Joe Lennon +7, Martin Stephenson +12, Robert Lay +10 (third-place play-off)
Robert Lay (1) beat James Hopgood +4T
Martin Stephenson (2) beat Joe Lennon +10, +9
James Hopgood (2) beat Martin Stephenson 5T, Joe Lennon +3T
Joe Lennon (0)

2007:     David Appleton (6 wins) beat Martin Stephenson +8, James Hopgood +17, Alan Wilson +23, Allan Hawke +21, Jim Gillespie +9tp, Joe Lennon +24
Martin Stephenson (5) beat James Hopgood +23tp, Alan Wilson +13, Allan Hawke +5, Jim Gillespie +16, Joe Lennon +5T
James Hopgood (4) beat Alan Wilson +14, Allan Hawke +12, Jim Gillespie +19, Joe Lennon +20
Alan Wilson (3) beat Allan Hawk +9, Jim Gillespie +23, Joe Lennon +17
Allan Hawke (1) beat Jim Gillespie +4
Jim Gillespie (1) beat Joe Lennon +6
Joe Lennon (1) beat Allan Hawke +5

2008:     Campbell Morrison (5 wins) beat Alan Wilson+22, Allan Hawke +15, Tony Whateley +5T (24-19), Joe Lennon +18, Robert Lay +24
Alan Wilson (4) beat Allan Hawke +17, Tony Whateley +7, Joe Lennon +13, Robert Lay +23
Allan Hawke (3) beat Tony Whateley +8T (21-13), Joe Lennon +19, Robert Lay +15
Tony Whateley (2) beat Joe Lennon+7T (24-17), Robert Lay +1T (19-18)
Joe Lennon (1) beat Robert Lay +1T (22-21)
Robert Lay (0)

2009:     Alan Wilson (6 wins) beat Joe Lennon +14, +22, Robert Lay +16, +20, Alasdair Adam +19, +10T (20-10)
Joe Lennon (4) beat Robert Lay +7T (18-11), +19, Alasdair Adam +10T (19-9), +10T (14-4)
Robert Lay (2) beat Alasdair Adam +7T (18-11), +10T (22-12)
Alasdair Adam (0)

2010:    No tournament

2011:     Alan Wilson (5 wins/5) beat Esther Jones +15, Robert Lay +16, Joe Lennon +15, Bill Spalding +15, Tony Whateley +6
Bill Spalding (4/5) beat Jola Jurasinska +24tp, Joe Lennon +13, Jamieson Walker +16tp, Tony Whateley +13
Robert Lay (3/5) beat Hamish Duguid +6, Esther Jones +22, Jamieson Walker +10
Tony Whateley (3/5) beat Jola Jurasinska +15, Joe Lennon +7T, Jamieson Walker +18
Hamish Duguid (2/4) beat Esther Jones +4T, Jola Jurasinska +16
Esther Jones (2/5) beat Jola Jurasinska +4T, Jamieson Walker +2T
Joe Lennon (2/5) beat Jola Jurasinska +21, Robert Lay +21
Jamieson Walker (2/6) beat Hamish Duguid +2T, Jola Jurasinska +13
Jola Jurasinska (0/6)

2012:     Alan Wilson (5wins/5) beat Jola Jurasinska +21, Robert Lay +22, Joe Lennon +5, Jamieson Walker +7, Robert Inder +4T (21-17)
Robert Inder (3/5) beat Jamieson Walker +11, Jola Jurasinska +26, Robert Lay +13
Jamieson Walker (3/5) beat Jola Jurasinska +19, Robert Lay +22, Joe Lennon +21
Robert Lay (2/5) beat Joe Lennon +7, Jola Jurasinska +17T (24-7)
Joe Lennon (2/5) beat Robert Inder +8T (25-17), Jola Jurasinska +13
Jola Jurasinska (0/5)

2013: