Glasgow Open

Trophy:  Silver Plated Cup

This event was started in 1994 and has run each April since then.  It is Advanced Play, usually blocks or Swiss. 

Roll of honour:

 

Winner

Runner-up

1994       

J. Surgenor

G. Anderson

1995       

J. Surgenor

M.J. O’Connell

1996       

J. Surgenor

R. ap W. Williams

1997       

M.J. O’Connell

J. Surgenor

1998       

M.J. O’Connell

J. Taggart

1999       

J. Surgenor

M.J. O’Connell

2000       

J. Surgenor

R. ap W. Williams

2001       

B. Green

D.R. Appleton

2002       

B.M. Rannie

J. Surgenor

2003       

J. Surgenor

J. Walker

2004       

J. Surgenor

B. Durward

2005       

J. Surgenor

J. Shorten

2006       

J. Shorten

B.M. Rannie

2007       

B.M. Rannie

J.R. Hopgood

2008       

B.M. Rannie

J. Shorten

2009       

B.M. Rannie

D. Watts

2010       

C.I. Morrison

M.J. O’Connell

2011       

C.I. Morrison

J. Morrison

2012       

W. Spalding

A.A. Wilson

 

 

Reports:

9 – 10 April, 1994 at Glasgow:

(Report by Rod Williams)

Some folk thought that holding a competition in Glasgow in early April would be asking for trouble from the weather gods.  How wrong they were!  Only a very thin layer of ice needed to be scraped of the equipment box as the manager set out the lawns, and during the course of the weekend the competitors chortled merrily as the sleet and icy wind alternated with warm (well, sunny) weather.  Players’ handicaps ranged from -½ to 14 and all were keen to play advanced rules, so the competition was arranged as two blocks of five, advanced rules throughout, with the two blocks being as near equal a possible, i.e. there was no top block.

Block ‘A’ comprised John Surgenor (-½), Malcolm O’Connell (1½), Colin Dinwoodie (4), Charlotte Townsend (7) and Su Stenhouse (11).

Block ‘B’ comprised Rod Williams (1), John Portwood (2½), Jim Taggart (6), George Anderson (8) and Dave McLaughlin (14).

After the four block games, final positions in the blocks were decided on wins, followed by points.  The original plan was to have each player play his/her opposite number in the other block.  However, since the manager had failed to notice this would require a third lawn and he was too lazy to lay one, only the block winners were forced to play off to decide the overall competition winner – the other matches were made optional.

There was an additional prize to provide more interest for the higher handicap players – the ‘Eggselence Trophy’ for the person producing the biggest upset (measured by adding up the index points won for any game in which more than ten points changed hands, i.e. you scored nothing for any game going ‘as expected’.  As it was most people’s first effort of the year, there was not a TP in sight, though there were a couple of TPFs and one or two multi-hoop breaks.

The winner, not surprisingly, was Scottish Champion John Surgenor, who continues to win game after game despite sometimes playing the most awful rubbish (Who said ‘sour grapes from the correspondent’?).

Best results of the tournament came from the upsets:

Winner of the Eggselence Trophy, George Anderson (8), was in both accurate and break-making form beating Jim Taggart (6) and Rod Williams (1), giving 29 eggselence points.  Egg runner-up, and propping up the handicap list, Dave McLaughlin (14) won only one game, but he did enjoy that one particularly – beating John Portwood (2½) by +3; that result caused applause all round as you might imagine!

1995:

(Report by Malcolm O’Connell)

Run by Glasgow Croquet Club for the second year, this two-day advanced play tournament is held at Glasgow Green on the weekend following Easter.  You ought to be able to make your own assessment of the weather potential that early in the season, but in an exaggerated repeat of 1994, it was blood freezing on the Saturday and hot, hot, hot on the Sunday, and so it would appear to be better than the weather potential for the West of Scotland Tournament when horizontal sleet comes with a money back guarantee.   Why then has the Glasgow Open attracted only half the number of entries for the West of Scotland?  Is it because:

  1. It’s only for low handicap players? 

No, it’s open to players of any handicap but 14 is the highest so far.  For players with handicaps of about 6 or over this is an excellent opportunity to acquire risk free mega handicap index points (IPs) by catching any of the top six players off guard.  Last year there was a prize for the best result against handicap, won by Dave McLaughlin who beat John Portwood for 19 IPs; this year Su Stenhouse beat David Appleton for 18 IPs but because someone had eaten all the Easter eggs this went unrewarded.

  1. It’s too early in the season?

Well it can’t be this because it’s held (ideally) one or two weeks before the SCA Middle Bisquers’ Coaching Course and allows participants to brush up on their play in advance (sic) and see live the first triple peels of the season (JS, MO’C).

  1. Of the lack of facilities at Glasgow Green?

It can’t be this either because they have knocked down the wee hut which has eased car parking and substantially changed the prospect of the wee shop which has changed hands and continents and has reverted to selling bacon and egg rolls, hot pies and cups of tea and coffee.  Much rejoicing.

  1. It’s unsociable?

Certainly not.  Even with this small entry and half the competitors suffering frostbite, we still managed to organise two piss-ups, a trip to Babbity Bowsters, the Glasgow AGM, a committee meeting and a curry afterwards.

  1. It’s too far to travel?

Well this really depends where you are coming from, but if it’s Newcastle upon Tyne, there seems to be no problem, viz.:

1994:  Su Stenhouse, Jim Taggart, John Portwood

1995:  Su Stenhouse, Jim Taggart, Malcolm O’Connell, David Appleton

But Edinburgh players seem unaware of the M8 and too many potential competitors are failing to get past the Barnton roundabout.  Those that did:

1994:  Charlotte Townsend, George Anderson, Colin Dinwoodie

1995:  George Anderson

  1. Of the incomprehensible format / results system?

I think this may well be the nub of the problem.  There were eight competitors and everybody was to play everybody else.  The only two to achieve this were Malcolm and John with seven games each; everyone else managed only six games.  Although Malcolm and John only played each other once, the final result was a win for John +8, -4, +1.  Plus Eight was the score in the game they actually played.  Minus Four was the score from the Ladybird Book of Croquet Results as seen from the table below, listing net points.  The actual deciding result was Plus One determined by awarding players the number of wins gathered by the opponents they beat and then subtracting the number of losses of opponents to whom they lost.  EH?

 

 

Wins

Points

John Surgenor

6

+87

Rod Williams

4

-6

David Appleton

3

+22

Su Stenhouse

2

-69

Malcolm O’Connell

6

+91

Jim Taggart

1

-41

Dave McLaughlin

0

-68

George Anderson

3

-16

 

20 – 21 April, 1996 at Kelvingrove:

(Report by Tony Foster)

Surgenor Hat-Trick

Last year Malcolm O’Connell reported a notable absence of Edinburgh-based players at this now traditional season opener, attributing it to a failure to get past the Broxburn Roundabout on the M8.  The new motorway link to the Edinburgh Bypass has clearly solved this problem, as three players made their way west on 19th April to join three from Tyneside and two ‘Weegies.  The problems tended to arise much nearer Kelvingrove, however, at the cunningly designed Junction 18 on the motorway which has its slip road to the right of the fast lane rather than the left of the slow lane.  (After that follow the signs for Kelvingrove Museum for a mile or so and the lawns can be found on Kelvin Way, just below the main Glasgow University building with its wonderful spire.)

Kelvingrove definitely seems to me to be an improvement over Glasgow Green.  The park, museum and University make a very pleasant backdrop when you are watching your opponent set up a cunning leave and there was a steady flow of onlookers to watch the croquet.  (However the football fan in me missed the big match atmosphere when Celtic were playing just down the road!)  There are also a number of shops and a pub close by and, an outstanding innovation at a Scottish croquet venue, public toilets.

Despite the new facilities, the Glasgow Open still only attracted a modest entry.  Why?  Looking back over last season, a similar pattern emerges: very low entries for Open events.  One event, the Chairman’s Rosebowl, failed to attract any entrants at all!  I think that the reason for this is that people are worried that they are going to have to play John Surgenor or Malcolm O’Connell without any bisques and when they lose, it’s going to reduce their hard earned handicap index by ten points.  Well, I’ve got news for them: it won’t, because the number reduces as the gap between the two handicaps increases.  In fact, if like me, you enjoy the occasional flutter, you might find the odds on offer at open events well worth a wager.

To illustrate what I mean, consider how few index points losing a match in an open event might cost you (if you are not in the ‘A’ class).  Better still, consider how many you do earn if, by a bit of luck and determined play, you manage to win a game or two.  For example, playing off 10 I risked only one index point against Malcolm (½) but stood to gain 19 if I won.  Maybe I’ve got an inflated view of my own abilities but if William Hill had been offering odds of 19-1 against me beating Malcolm I might have risked 50p.  They certainly would not have found many takers for Malcolm at 1-19 on – even Mike Tyson was only 1-8 on against Frank Bruno!

As it was I very nearly beat Malcolm, losing by four after he hit a sixteen yard lift shot when I was for peg and 4-back.  He would argue that it made up for his earlier defeat by Rod Williams who had hit a similarly crucial lift shot with the aid of a fluky rebound off a wire.

If William Hill had been running a book on the event, John Surgenor would have started as hot favourite and, sure enough, he lifted the trophy for the third time, but only on points from Malcolm and Rod.  Each of the three had won four games and, with the games between them won one apiece, this seemed the only fair way to separate them – although Rod, as manager, spent a little while trying various alternatives!  The standard of play from the rest of us was, let’s say, variable, but at least we all had the excuse that it was a bit early in the season to be on top form!

1997:

No report has been found.  Malcolm O’Connell won.

25 – 26 April, 1998 at Kelvingrove:

(Report by Charlotte Townsend)

The Glasgow Open was held on 25th and 26th April at Kelvingrove; there were eleven entries, ranging in handicap from -½ to 9.

By Sunday afternoon four players each had four wins – Malcolm O’Connell, John Surgenor, Andy Campbell and Jim Taggart (who had also had a bye – technically a win).  Malcolm and John, who had already played once, played again and Malcolm won.  Andy had played Malcolm earlier and won, meaning that if he won his final game (against Charlotte) he would win the tournament.  After a weekend of excellent play, he suddenly seemed to be feeling the effect of only three hours sleep the night before, and allowed Charlotte to take a convincing lead.  With time called he suddenly came to life, but clanged 4-back and gave Charlotte the game and Malcolm the trophy.

The tournament was an enjoyable start to the season and it was good to see players with a range of handicaps participating.

17 – 18 April, 1999 at Kelvingrove:

(Report by George Anderson)

Open to All Comers

We arrived at the lawns to a remarkable scene.  Two enormous white plastic palaces covered most of the two lower lawns.  My first thought was that Rod had got his act together and made provision for the bad weather that was forecast.  As it turned out, the weather was brilliant, which was just as well as the plastic palaces were part of the 150th celebrations of a large financial organisation.  Along with these were a coconut shy, a helter skelter, a samba band and a troupe of exotic dancers, the most attractive of whom turned out to be an acolyte of our Drugs Enforcement Officer.  Despite these distractions some croquet was played.  Most of the matches went to handicap with a few notable exceptions, the best examples of which were the Drugs Enforcement Officer beating our Head Coach, and the Entertainment Officer whitewashing our Match Secretary.

The Kelvingrove lawns were in excellent condition especially so early in the season, so it is to be hoped that the various rumours about five-a-side football pitches and car parks have no foundation.  The Glasgow Open has only been running for a few years but it is proving to be one of the best events of the season.  I hope that it will run for many years to come.

The aforementioned ‘extra-croqueal’ activities do not bode well for the future of croquet at Kelvingrove.  It has always been a problem keeping the younger members of the public from playing fitba’ and cycling on the lawns without this unfortunate example being set.  The only saving grace, according to our more fastidious players, was the presence of Superloos (really, really super) on this occasion.

Brilliant weather, brilliant lawns, brilliant dancers and brilliant loos but bl**dy croquet (George didn’t win too many games!)

22 – 23 April, 2000 at Kelvingrove:

Bacon rolls started the players off, for better or for worse, in the first tournament of the season.  John Surgenor, Rod Williams, David Appleton, Charlotte Townsend and Jamieson Walker (in handicap order) were the players who risked the still-wintry conditions to fight out this contest.

The first day started off with surprisingly good weather – for a while T-shirts adorned the lawns, and players sipped cool drinks rather than warming their hands on their coffees.  This coincided with few surprises on the croquet front – John beat David and Charlotte, as did Rod.  Jamieson, having lost to Rod, then skewed what handicaps might have suggested should have been the results.  As hailstones began to fall, he beat both David and Charlotte, who were so demoralised that they couldn’t bear to play each other the following day.  (To be strictly honest, Charlotte was the chief wimp here.)

Day 2 was therefore left with few games.  Jamieson surrendered to John, leaving the final game between John and Rod to be played without an audience, as the remaining players all went home.  This was a shame, since it was probably the only game of any real interest to be played over the weekend.  John started off tentatively, only reaching hoops 2 and 6.  Rod then took the initiative, going round to 4-back with a good leave, and after John failed to hit in, succeeded in the three peels he needed to win the game.  To stick in rover at this point was, however, a basic flaw in his strategy, and John took advantage of this and won.

Congratulations to John and commiserations to Jamieson who feels that the poor performance of David and Charlotte should qualify him to go to Milan (for the 1st WCF 14-pt Team Championship) in their place.  He’s probably right, but they’re both still ahead of him in the rankings (and handicaps) – at the moment.  (David has at least shown his true form in the Middle Bisquers since.)  But John reckons Jamieson’s handicap is way above its proper level – so we’ll be watching to see who goes to Sonoma next year…

21 – 22 April, 2001 at Glasgow:

(Report by David Appleton)

It was, as usual, pretty cold for the Glasgow Open, but nine brave souls got the Scottish competitive season under way at Kelvingrove on 21st and 22nd April.  Bruce Rannie, fresh from two tournaments in England, at both of which he had reduced his handicap, was the only player to have made a roquet in anger since last autumn, so there were signs of rust and the general standard of play was about what one might expect of a dreich April weekend.

Ben Green, whose job has recently entailed moving from Edinburgh to Glasgow, won fairly convincingly, with five wins out of six, though runner-up David Appleton took a game off him on the Sunday.  The most surprising result was when Bruce beat John Surgenor by a single point after John had pegged out two balls with himself on 4-back and Bruce on hoop 3.

Charlotte Townsend played most adventurously having several attempts at triples, not all of which came to immediate grief.  Jamieson Walker, as might be expected on handicap, lost all his games, but we have learned not to expect Jamieson to play to handicap and so in fact it came as rather a surprise.  Jamieson did not exactly end up with egg on his face, but he did succeed in getting it nearly everywhere else when he ill-advisedly ordered and bit into a lightly fried egg roll from Qcumber’s ‘wee shop’ which provided sustenance for most of the players.  With nine entrants someone is always sitting out and trips to the shop were frequent.  Charlotte, however, spent her free time buying a radio on which we could all listen to Rod being interviewed by John Beattie of the BBC.  Oddly enough, by finishing eighth, Campbell was the only person to reduce his handicap!

Socially the event was as successful as ever: lots of laughs and a promising start to the new season.  The croquet will improve when the sun shines.  The modified block structure was a modified success but will be improved before it is used again.  Oh, and the referees were on the ball when it came to remembering not to replace it (because of the new Laws which came into effect in 2001).

Talking of runner-up, John and David each had four wins, so it all depends on how you work it out.  If you used the method in David’s paper (‘May the best man win?’ published in The Statistician in 1995) then David comes out marginally ahead – but I would say that, wouldn’t I!

20 – 21 April, 2002 at Kelvingrove:

(Report by Charlotte Townsend)

The Glasgow Club started the croquet year with a swing, with more people attending the AGM (six) than for some time, and the first club night and afternoon attracting similar numbers – all this despite the fact that over 10% of the club’s members were due to have their babies at any moment!

So it was good to see the Glasgow Open also attracting six participants (none of them pregnant), despite the less than clement weather.  Saturday started dull and slightly drizzly, and the weekend continued in the same vein, getting rather wetter as time went by.  Those of us who had worn our thermals were glad of them, although it was not as cold as it often is at this time of the year.

Bruce Rannie’s new mallet performed well for him, as he seemed almost incapable of missing with it.  Adding his ability to roll across heavy lawns to get perfect hoop position (for him anyway – some of us prefer to get a little closer to the hoop!), his overall win at the end of the weekend over lower handicapped players was not surprising.  John Surgenor (½) appeared to have won the first game, with only a turn needed to finish from peg and penult, and Bruce (1½) still for hoops 1 and 1, when Bruce took over and won a surprise first game.  He even tried a straight triple peel, which failed when jump peeling at penult resulted in a peeled peelee, but his other ball joined up with oppo and not through the hoop.  His only loss was against Chris Dent (-½), who seems to have recovered from his last year’s wrist injury and played better than the results suggest over the weekend.

By Sunday afternoon, Bruce, John and Chris were all in contention for the cup, with three wins each and one game to play.  Chris had been beaten by Rod (1) with the first triple peel of the season, and John had lost only to Bruce.  Bruce played Jamieson Walker and his +26 score meant that relatively early in the match between Chris and John, it became a matter of which of them was to be runner-up, since neither could now win overall.  John won (perhaps the prospect of a further interview with the Herald journalist was putting Chris off?) and became runner-up.

Rod won two games to come fourth, with the highlight of his weekend being the triple against Chris.  The lowlight was his generous loss to Charlotte Townsend, who was in the doldrums having, as usual, just lost to Jamieson Walker.  (Losing to Jamieson and winning against Rod has become a traditional part of Charlotte’s Glasgow Open.)  Thanks to these results, all three narrowly avoided handicap changes in the wrong direction.

2003:

No report has been found.  Winner: John Surgenor.  Only three players took part.

2004:

No report has been found.  Winner: John Surgenor.  Four players took part.

2005:

This report is already on the website.

2006:

This report is already on the website.

2007:

This report is already on the website.

2008:

This report is already on the website.

2009:

This report is already on the website.

2010:

This report is already on the website.

2011:

This report is already on the website.

2012:

This report is already on the website.

 

Results:

1994:    
Block ‘A’:

 

JS

MO’C

CD

SS

CT

Wins

John Surgenor

 

+21

+2T

+20

+17

4

Malcolm O’Connell

-21

 

+20

+14

+11

3

Colin Dinwoodie

-2T

-20

 

+16

+25

2

Su Stenhouse

-20

-14

-16

 

+3T

1

Charlotte Townsend

-17

-11

-25

-3T

 

0

              Block ‘B’:

 

RW

JP

JT

GA

DMcL

Wins

George Anderson

+2T

-23

+3

 

+1T

3

John Portwood

+23

 

-17

+23

-3

2

Jim Taggart

-2

+17

 

-3

+3

2

Rod Williams

 

-23

+2

-2T

+16

2

Dave McLaughlin

-16

+3

-3

-1T

 

1

              Final:
John Surgenor beat George Anderson
Other match:
Jim Taggart beat Colin Dinwoodie +4

1995:     John Surgenor (6 wins/7) beat Rod Williams, Su Stenhouse tp, Malcolm O’Connell, Jim Taggart, Dave McLaughlin, George Anderson
Malcolm O’Connell (6/7) beat Rod Williams tp, David Appleton, Su Stenhouse, Jim Taggart, Dave McLaughlin, George Anderson
Rod Williams (4/6) beat Su Stenhouse, Jim Taggart, Dave McLaughlin, George Anderson
George Anderson (3/6) beat David Appleton, Su Stenhouse, Dave McLaughlin
David Appleton (3/6) beat John Surgenor, Jim Taggart, Dave McLaughlin
Su Stenhouse (2/6) beat David Appleton, Jim Taggart
Jim Taggart (1/6) beat Dave McLaughlin
Dave McLaughlin (0/6)

1996:     John Surgenor (4 wins/5) beat Su Stenhouse +5T, Charlotte Townsend +11, Rod Williams +17, Jim Taggart +20
Rod Williams (4/5) beat Jim Taggart +23, Charlotte Townsend +6T, Malcolm O’Connell +4, Jamieson Walker +12
Malcolm O’Connell (4/5) beat Jamieson Walker +15, John Surgenor +3, Jim Taggart +4, Tony Foster +4
Charlotte Townsend (3/5) beat Tony Foster +7T, Jamieson Walker +16, Su Stenhouse +16
Tony Foster (2/5) beat Jamieson Walker +11, Su Stenhouse +14
Jim Taggart (2/5) beat Tony Foster +11, Su Stenhouse +4
Su Stenhouse (1/5) beat Jamieson Walker +7T
Jamieson Walker (0/5)

1997:     Malcolm O’Connell (5 wins/5) beat Jamieson Walker +12, Alan Burn +13T, Jim Taggart +24, John Surgenor +14, Charlotte Townsend +19
John Surgenor (3/4) beat Brian Kennedy +22, Alan Burn +16, Rod Williams +16
Jim Taggart (3/5) beat Su Stenhouse +2T, Charlotte Townsend +6T, Jamieson Walker +12T
Charlotte Townsend (3/5) beat Rod Williams +2T, Su Stenhouse +10T, Alan Burn +4T
Rod Williams (2/4) beat Brian Kennedy +4, Jim Taggart +1
Alan Burn (2/5) beat Brian Kennedy +1T, Su Stenhouse +4T
Su Stenhouse (1/4) beat Jamieson Walker +15
Brian Kennedy (1/4) beat Jamieson Walker +7T
Jamieson Walker (0/4)

1998:     Malcolm O’Connell (5 wins/6) beat Steve Barnett, Rod Williams, John Surgenor, Charlotte Townsend, John Surgenor
John Surgenor (4/6) beat Su Stenhouse, Andy Campbell, Charlotte Townsend, Rod Williams
Andy Campbell (4/6) beat Malcolm O’Connell, Su Stenhouse, Rod Williams, David Appleton
Charlotte Townsend (4/6) beat Steve Barnett, Jamieson Walker, Su Stenhouse, Andy Campbell
Jim Taggart (4/5) beat David Appleton, Jamieson Walker, Tony Foster, Su Stenhouse
Rod Williams (3/6) beat Tony Foster, Jim Taggart, Jamieson Walker
Steve Barnett (2/5) beat David Appleton, Jamieson Walker
Tony Foster (2/5) beat Steve Barnett, David Appleton
Su Stenhouse (1/5) beat Tony Foster
Jamieson Walker (1/5) beat David Appleton
David Appleton (0/5)

1999:     Swiss competition:
John Surgenor (6 wins/6) beat David Appleton, Su Stenhouse, Charlotte Townsend, Rod Williams, Malcolm O’Connell, Jim Taggart
Malcolm O’Connell (4/5) beat Jamieson Walker, David Appleton, Jim Taggart, Charlotte Townsend
Rod Williams (3/5) beat Jim Taggart, David Appleton, George Anderson
Jim Taggart (2/6) beat George Anderson, Su Stenhouse
Charlotte Townsend (2/5) beat George Anderson, Rod Williams
David Appleton (1/5) beat Jim Taggart
George Anderson (1/4) beat Jamieson Walker
Jamieson Walker (1/4) beat David Appleton
Su Stenhouse (1/3) beat Jamieson Walker

 

2000:    

 

JS

RW

JW

DA

CT

Wins

John Surgenor

 

+1

+21

+23

+13

4

Rod Williams

-1

 

+13

+11

+25

3

Jamieson Walker

-21

-13

 

+15

+3

2

David Appleton

-23

-11

-15

 

 

0

Charlotte Townsend

-13

-25

-3

 

 

0

2001: 

 

BG

DA

JS

BD

BR

RW

CT

CM

JW

Wins

Ben Green

 

-14

+23

+12

+18

+25

+22

 

 

5

David Appleton

+14

 

 

+3

-12

-16

+10

+12

 

4

John Surgenor

-23

 

 

+8

-1

+15

 

+10

+12

4

Brian Durward

-12

-3

-8

 

+9

 

+16

 

+7T

3

Bruce Rannie

-18

+12

+1

-9

 

 

 

-2t

+17

3

Rod Williams

-25

+16

-15

 

 

 

-14

+14

+13

3

Charlotte Townsend

-22

-10

 

-16

 

+14

 

+19

+11

3

Campbell Morrison

 

-12

-10

 

+2t

-14

-19

 

+1T

2

Jamieson Walker

 

 

-12

-7T

-17

-13

-11

-1T

 

0

2002:

 

BR

JS

CD

RW

CT

JW

Wins

Points

Bruce Rannie

 

+4

-5

+7

+26

+26

4

+58

John Surgenor

-4

 

+19

+17

+10

+10

4

+52

Chris Dent

+5

-19

 

-15

+24

+24

3

+19

Rod Williams

-7

-17

+15tp

 

-10

+16

2

-3

Charlotte Townsend

-26

-10

-24

+10

 

-3T

1

-53

Jamieson Walker

-26

-10

-24

-16

+3T

 

1

-73

2003:

 

JS

JW

BD

Wins

John Surgenor

 

+16

+10

2

Jamieson Walker

-16

 

+8

1

Brian Durward

-10

-8

 

0

2004:    

 

JS

BD

MOC

JL

Wins

John Surgenor

 

+3

+10

+18

3

Brian Durward

-3

 

+4T

+22

2

Malcolm O’Connell

-10

-4T

 

+26tp

1

Joe Lennon

-18

-22

-26

 

0

2005:     John Surgenor (5/6) beat Joe Lennon +26, Rod Williams +15, Jane Shorten +17, Campbell Morrison +17, Jamieson Walker +25tp
Jane Shorten (5/6) beat Charlotte Townsend +2T, Rod Williams +15, Bruce Rannie +17, Jamieson Walker +1T, Campbell Morrison +15
Bruce Rannie (4/6) beat Jamieson Walker +17, John Surgenor +25, Campbell Morrison +26, Joe Lennon +20
Rod Williams (3/5) beat Campbell Morrison +5, Jamieson Walker +1T, Joe Lennon +17
Charlotte Townsend (2/5) beat Joe Lennon +26, Bruce Rannie +5
Campbell Morrison (2/6) beat Charlotte Townsend +1T, Joe Lennon +10
Joe Lennon (1/6) beat Jamieson Walker +2T
Jamieson Walker (1/6) beat Charlotte Townsend +16

2006:     Jane Shorten (5/6) beat John Surgenor +23, Bruce Rannie +17, Campbell Morrison +7, Su Stenhouse +15, Malcolm O'Connell +17
Bruce Rannie (5/6) beat Joe Lennon +6T, Martin Stephenson +20tp, Tony Whateley +22, Robert Lay +23, John Surgenor +24
John Surgenor (4/6) beat Martin Stephenson +4, Robert Lay +17, Malcolm O'Connell +26tp, Campbell Morrison +8
Campbell Morrison (4/6) beat Su Stenhouse +3T, Robert Lay +4T, Joe Lennon +19, Martin Stephenson +7T
Martin Stephenson (3/6) beat Jane Shorten +3T, Joe Lennon +3T, Malcolm O'Connell +3T
Su Stenhouse (3/5) beat Malcolm O'Connell +4T, Tony Whateley +13, Robert Lay +1T
Malcolm O'Connell (2/6) beat Joe Lennon +20, Tony Whateley +23
Robert Lay (2/6) beat Tony Whateley +5T, Joe Lennon +1T
Joe Lennon (1/6) beat Tony Whateley +21
Tony Whateley (0/5)

2007:     Bruce Rannie (6/6) beat Campbell Morrison +2, Robert Lay +25, Duncan Reeves +22, James Hopgood +12, Martin Stephenson +17, John Surgenor +24tp
James Hopgood (5/6) beat Martin Stephenson +13, John Surgenor +18, Campbell Morrison +15, Joe Lennon +16, Duncan Reeves +14
John Surgenor (3/5) beat Tony Whateley +24, Martin Stephenson +4, Robert Lay +12
Martin Stephenson (3/6) beat Campbell Morrison +5, Joe Lennon +20, Tony Whateley +26
Joe Lennon (2/5) beat Duncan Reeves +22, Robert Lay +2T
Robert Lay (2/5) beat Tony Whateley +2T, Campbell Morrison +7T
Tony Whateley (2/5) beat Joe Lennon +7T, Duncan Reeves +2T
Campbell Morrison (1/5) beat Duncan Reeves +22
Duncan Reeves (0/5)

2008:     Bruce Rannie (5/5) beat Jane Shorten +17, Brian Murdoch +22, James Hopgood +26tp, Martin Stephenson +25, Joe Lennon +12
Jane Shorten (4/5) beat Brian Murdoch +26, James Hopgood +17, Martin Stephenson +22, Joe Lennon +25
Brian Murdoch (3/6) beat Martin Stephenson +15, Robert Lay +15, Joe Lennon +12T (24-12)
James Hopgood (3/6) beat Brian Murdoch +9, Robert Lay +9T (22-13), Joe Lennon +24
Martin Stephenson (2/5) beat James Hopgood +25, Robert Lay +16
Robert Lay (1/4) beat Joe Lennon +16
Joe Lennon (0/5) 

2009:     Bruce Rannie (6/7) beat Derek Watts +17tp, Campbell Morrison +24, Fergus McInnes +9T (22-13), Alan Wilson +20, Tony Whateley +12, Joe Lennon +11
Derek Watts (5/7) beat Campbell Morrison +14, Fergus McInnes +1T (19-18), Tony Whateley +19, Joe Lennon +20, Martin Stephenson +21
Alan Wilson (4/7) beat Derek Watts +13, Campbell Morrison +5T (22-17), Fergus McInnes +18, Martin Stephenson +6T (21-15)
Campbell Morrison (3/7) beat Fergus McInnes +14T (25-11), Tony Whateley +16, Martin Stephenson +20
Tony Whateley (3/7) beat Alan Wilson +9T (21-12), Joe Lennon +12T (20-8), Martin Stephenson +1T (16-15)
Joe Lennon (3/7) beat Campbell Morrison +1T (20-19), Fergus McInnes +8T (24-16), Alan Wilson +1T (17-16)
Fergus McInnes (2/7) beat Tony Whateley +8T (23-15), Martin Stephenson +12T (19-7)
Martin Stephenson (2/7) beat Bruce Rannie +25, Joe Lennon +6 

2010:    Campbell Morrison (4/4) beat Joe Lennon +9T (24-15), Alan Wilson +16, Bill Spalding +1T (20-19), Malcolm O'Connell +21
Malcolm O'Connell (3/5) beat Jola Jurasinska +25, Jamieson Walker +24tp, Bill Spalding +22
Alan Wilson (3/5) beat Jola Jurasinska +23, Malcolm O'Connell +21, Bill Spalding +3T (24-21)
Joe Lennon (2/4) beat Jola Jurasinska +4T (20-16), Jamieson Walker +7
Jamieson Walker (2/4) beat Alan Wilson +5T (25-20), Jola Jurasinska +6T (19-13)
Bill Spalding beat Joe Lennon +12T (25-13)
Jola Jurasinska (0/4)

2011:     Campbell Morrison beat Joe Lennon +18, Jamieson Walker +20, Jane Morrison +17, Malcolm O’Connell +13T (20-7), Martin Stephenson +9
Jane Morrison beat Tony Whateley +17, Jola Jurasinska +23, Martin Stephenson +5, Malcolm O’Connell +5
Martin Stephenson beat Jola Jurasinska +26, Tony Whateley +12, Malcolm O’Connell +17
Malcolm O’Connell beat Jamieson Walker +23, Joe Lennon +1T (23-22)
Tony Whateley beat Joe Lennon +9, Jola Jurasinska +10T (22-12), Jamieson Walker +11
Jamieson Walker beat Jola Jurasinska +11, Joe Lennon + 8T (24-16)
Joe Lennon beat Jola Jurasinska +5T (22-17)   
Final:  Campbell Morrison (one game up) beat Jane Morrison -3, +16

2012:     Swiss:
Round One:
John Surgenor beat Martin Stephenson +1T (17-16)
Jane Morrison beat Joe Lennon +19
Campbell Morrison beat Robert Lay +1T (14-13)
Fergus McInnes beat Richard Sparrow (stand-in) +23
Alan Wilson beat Tony Brightman +2T (18-16)
Round Two:
Jane Morrison beat John Surgenor +26
Campbell Morrison beat Fergus McInnes +12
Bill Spalding beat Alan Wilson +1T (15-14)
Martin Stephenson beat Joe Lennon +12
Robert Lay beat Tony Brightman +4T (16-12)
Round Three:
Campbell Morrison beat Jane Morrison +22
Bill Spalding beat John Surgenor +1T (22-21)
Martin Stephenson beat Fergus McInnes +21
Alan Wilson beat Robert Lay +18T (23-5)
Joe Lennon beat Tony Brightman +1T (21-20)
Round Four:
Bill Spalding beat Campbell Morrison +26
Jane Morrison beat Martin Stephenson +20
Alan Wilson beat John Surgenor+6T (21-15)
Fergus McInnes beat Tony Brightman +9T (21-12)
Semi-finals:
Bill Spalding beat Jane Morrison +10
Alan Wilson beat Campbell Morrison +9T (23-14)
Remainder of Round Five:
John Surgenor beat Joe Lennon +18
Martin Stephenson beat Tony Brightman +22
Fergus McInnes beat Robert Lay +16
Final:
Bill Spalding beat Alan Wilson +10
Remainder of Round Six:
Campbell Morrison beat John Surgenor +22
Jane Morrison beat Tony Brightman +16
Martin Stephenson beat Robert Lay +23tp
Joe Lennon beat Fergus McInnes +2T (18-16)