Scottish Masters

Trophy:

This tournament was introduced in 1991 to replace the Invitation Doubles events which had been first used at the Official Opening of the first National Croquet Centre at Bush in 1989 and repeated in 1990.  It was and still is intended to be a high quality event.  Play is under advanced rules.  From 2009, any unallocated places are advertised outside Scotland (until then it was restricted to SCA members, as one of the ways of bringing on potential Scottish International players).

Roll of honour:

 

Winner

Runner-up

1991       

Ian Bond

Alan Bogle

1992       

David Appleton

John Surgenor

1993       

Rod Williams

Mike Ranshaw

1994       

John Surgenor

Malcolm O’Connell

1995       

Malcolm O’Connell

John Surgenor

1996       

Strat Liddiard

Rod Williams

1997       

John Surgenor

Rod Williams

1998       

Andy Campbell

Malcolm O’Connell

1999       

John Surgenor

David Appleton

2000       

John Surgenor

Charlotte Townsend

2001       

Gail Curry

David Appleton

2002       

Chris Dent

Nigel Gardner

2003       

John Surgenor

Tony Foster

2004       

Bruce Rannie

Malcolm O’Connell

2005       

Charlotte Townsend

John Surgenor

2006       

Fergus McInnes

Robert Lay

2007       

Alan Wilson

James Hopgood

2008       

James Hopgood

Fergus McInnes

2009       

James Hopgood

Bryan Sykes

2010       

James Hopgood

Fergus McInnes

2011       

James Hopgood

Campbell Morrison

2012       

Campbell Morrison

Jane Morrison

 

Reports:

25 – 27 May, 1991 at Bush:

(Report by Ian Bond)

It’s surprising the things one discovers, playing croquet.  I had realised that Bank Holidays north of the border did not always correspond with those in England, but I’d never quite appreciated (from the occasional disparities I’d noticed) that the whole system was so fundamentally different.  There I was, coming up to Edinburgh for what I thought was the Spring Bank Holiday weekend (why else would those three days have been chosen for the Masters?), only to discover that, no, Edinburgh had had its holiday the previous Monday.  It was a Glasgow holiday, though; no doubt that was why we were playing the Masters at Bush…

Still, it’s comforting to know that some things are clearly the same the world over: editors need their tournament reports, and they know their problem is solved as soon as they spot a defenceless visitor quietly admiring the scenery and trying hard to remember who everyone is.  So here I am, doing what I can to tell you all you need to know about the inaugural Scottish Masters.  A little difficult, given the format, to have spotted everything of note; but that’s the price you, the reader, must pay for us, the players, having had a very full weekend, and I will do my best.

Corla was determined to extract a much play as possible from the twelve of us, and decided, quite rightly, that we ought to be able to get through eleven rounds in the time available – only three games went to the 2¾-hr time limit.  The first round was uneventful, but the second produced the first triple – from Alan Bogle, who had again chosen the wrong occasion for trying to secure his CA Gold Award – and an excellent win for Fred Mann over the Manager.  Fred was evidently on form, losing only narrowly to Malcolm O’Connell in the next round.  The last round of the day saw a spectacular finish to the Appleton-Williams game, with Rod neatly laid up for rover (and peg), only for David to hit the twelve yard lift from B-baulk at his peg ball so cleanly that it was a perfect rush to rover, his hoop of course, and the game was snatched from Rod’s grasp.  So we headed off to The Steading with Bogle, Bond and Rogers (playing well, but against some of the weaker players) the undefeated leaders and a group of five players on two wins apiece.

Skip now to Round Six, which was noteworthy for Malcolm O’Connell’s  defeat of John Surgenor; but he did not continue his giant-killing into the next round against Alan Bogle, despite running hoop 2 from A-baulk.  David Appleton’s triple against Corla was probably the high point of Round Seven, but the best was kept until the end of the day with Alan very nearly coming to grief against David Warhurst, edging through +2 after David had had several opportunities to go out from peg and penult, and peg and rover.  It’s always easy to criticise from the boundary, but to me, this was a good example of what happens through a reluctance to attack the last few hoops in a tight situation, and instead to play defensive hoop approaches which do not really defend and do not get good position either.  Hedging your bets, or waiting for a better chance which so often does not come, rarely pays in such circumstances.

Day three, then, started with Bogle and Bond still undefeated and Appleton the nearest challenger, two adrift, but with Bond still to play.  It looked likely that the decisive game would be the final round encounter between the leaders, each of whom could still lose once provided they came off better in that vital game.

Bogle eased comfortably through Rounds Nine and Ten, but Bond had a less straightforward passage: +10 against Alastair Hunter, who was playing very well on his favourite lawn, in front of Bush House, but rather ran out of steam after an impressive start; then in some difficulty against Appleton, who, with Bond on hoop 6 and 4-back, took a ball to peg, conceding contact, with the best-controlled break of this weekend.  The leave, too, was very neat, but seemed to overlook the possibility of Bond playing with his 4-back ball – and was, as they say, refuted when he immediately took it to peg (less tidily that he should have done), with the inevitable consequences.  The ensuing three ball game provided only one good opportunity for Appleton who – pouncing on a tactical error after he had missed the 1-back lift, thereby tempting Bond into an injudicious shot – made hoop 2 and got into a good position at hoop 3 with a pioneer perfectly at hoop 4.  But it was not to be: he bounced off the hoop and had no further chances.

So a Bogle v Bond final duly arrived.  Let’s be honest, though, it was not an impressive game: Bond could not hit, Bogle could not run his hoops; but the latter failing proved – as it usually does – more serious than the other.  More noteworthy was Colin Rogers’ win over Rod Williams, giving him six wins which were fully justified by his play – notable in particular for good hitting, enough to alarm the stoutest opponents.

What more should I say?  Colin Dinwoodie must merit a word or two, because, despite what his results might imply, he did not play badly, and it’s good to see him back after a break of more than ten years from the game.  Thanks, of course, to Corla for keeping us all in order, and to Alastair Hunter and his helpers, whom I know have done so much to bring the Bush lawns up to their present standard (we must all hope they can survive the Electrical Contractors’ development ambitions).  Perhaps, if the Home Internationals are not in Glasgow next year, we will see a few more of the ‘exiles’ here: I know I shall be back if at all possible!

23 – 25 May, 1992 at Bush:

(Report by David Appleton)

Sadly Mist

Although much of the rest of the country was enjoying the sun, the weather at Bush for the 1992 Scottish Masters had more of the foggy, foggy dew than summer is icumen in.  For most of the three days the players could not see Bush House from the lawns.  What were visible, looming out of the day-long gloaming, were two enormous marquees, the erection of which had been of some interest to the would-be players waiting for the first round match between Malcolm and Mike to finish, and which later provided a cycle track and a roller-skating rink for potential spectators who found the unfolding drama too painful to contemplate.  But I am getting ahead of myself.

In the inaugural Masters there had been twelve players, who all played each other.  However, Ian Bond had not returned to defend his title, Alan Bogle had hurt his back, Rod Williams was playing in the World Championships, and four other entrants were also sadly missed.  The only newcomer was Mike Ranshaw, now of Cheltenham, and this meant that he, David Appleton, Alastair Hunter, Malcolm O’Connell, John Surgenor and Corla van Griethuysen would play each other twice (in the same format as the Chairman’s) to determine this year’s winner.

The first surprise didn’t take long to come: in the first round Alastair, the highest-handicapped of the six, beat the well-fancied John.  Alastair was to carry on the run which the previous weekend had given him the Middle Bisquers title, and played some very good croquet, but it was after two o’clock when Malcolm disposed of Mike +8T, manager Corla having imposed a time limit after three hours when they had made about ten hoops between them.  The lawns were indeed rather heavy and the hoops were suitably ungenerous for such a prestigious event, so conditions were never easy.  David mastered them best on the Saturday, having one triple and being the only player to win all three games.

Haar, Haar (Malcolm Smith, after hearing about the weather in the east)

The Sunday was no brighter, and we all had to fit in four games; thank goodness (again) for Mona, who kept the kettle boiling all day and provided us all with most welcome tea and coffee.  Malcolm ended a rather barren run by beating David to stop him from running away with the title, but at the close the latter was 6/7, and no-one else had more than four wins.  John and Alastair were his closest pursuers, but they did not have the protection of his lambskin collar.

Eventually about Monday lunchtime it cleared up, at about the start of what was essentially the deciding match.  David had lost to Mike, and Alastair had beaten Corla, so the meeting between the two leaders in round nine was crucial.  Alastair made no mistake until he unaccountably bounced off hoop 3 with his second ball – David’s hoop – and thereafter he had only one chance before going down +15 to give David the title with one round to go.

That round however was to see the best break of the weekend.  John had not been playing badly, but had made more mistakes than usual.  In their first game he had been on rover and peg with David nowhere, when he took off into the peg and allowed David his second triple.  In their rematch David hit the second shot, and, contrary to his usual tactics of laying a tice on the east boundary and going off in corner I, he rolled both balls near the peg.  John shot gently, hit, and went round to 4-back on a rock-solid three ball break.  David missed with what he thought was a safe shot, but John dug the balls out beautifully and set about the triple.  The peelee would not go through penult until too late to make the rover peel easy and it was sadly missed, but a tidy leave was good enough for John to finish on the seventh turn.

The presentation ceremony was as brief as it was informal, and David lifted the splendid new trophy, and the rather scruffier Boots carrier bag from which it had defied the elements.  On the whole a deserved winner (why won’t anyone else volunteer to write these reports?), though losing points on the new handicap system! Thanks go, as always, to the Bush members for preparing the lawns, particularly Ralph Pirrie and Brian Murdoch.

29 – 30 May, 1993 at Bush:

(Report by Andy Campbell)

The weather was variable, and so was the talent.  Sun, showers and win greeted the 1 to 7 handicappers, yours truly being dragged in screaming to make up numbers.  For my sins I was nominated to do this write up.  Having jotted some notes at the event, lost them, found them, forgot to do it, I’ve finally got some peace around Christmas time …

-       Allan Ramsay was ‘getting his eye in’, strutting round looking like a pirate.  Is that the new dress for SCA Development Officers?

-       The honours for shortest miss went to Corla van Griethuysen (one foot, I believe!).

-       ‘Peg out’ Rod Williams thought he had Jeremy Dyer beaten when he left him with a three ball break.

-       Meanwhile John Surgenor and David Appleton had their first games going to time in two years!

-       Mike Ranshaw – now what was he up to (apart from winning)?  I’ve got to mention him, but I’ve nothing on him.

-       I shot my blue into corner I, where green was already.  Not knowing where to place mine, I put it on top of green, where it stayed!  (I thought the SCA had nice round balls for competitions.)  Try that when you’re bored!

All in all, Allan and I felt like cannon fodder fed to six hungry players.  We consoled ourselves with the thought that at least there wasn’t much meat on the bones, as they only earned a point or two for beating us!  Rod won with eight wins, with Mike second on seven.  John, David and Corla all got six, with Jeremy on five.  I beat Allan.

1994:

No report has been found.  John Surgenor won five games out of his six, Malcolm O’Connell four, Alastair Hunter and Colin Dinwoodie three, and Mike Ranshaw one.

30 September – 1 October, 1995 at Bush:

Bulletin 54, July 1995, says “The Scottish Masters – wasn’t.”  However, results exist, because the tournament took place at the end of September instead of its usual May date.

(Report by David Appleton)

Old Masters

There were three of them about: David Appleton (1992), Rod Williams (1993) and John Surgenor (1994); only Ian Bond (1991) was absent.  There were also five apprentices for the 1995 Scottish Masters, played over September 30th and October 1st at Bush rather than as scheduled when there had been little interest in what was then intended to be a three day event (but without the dressage).  Now it was over the two days freed by West Midlands having cancelled their annual fixture, and manager George Anderson decided that, with 2½ hour time limits, we could all play each other.  Only Brian Murdoch and David agreed to play their last game (and very enjoyable it was, result unrecorded); Brian was looking to add to three wins, including one over Rod and a +1T against Charlotte, which had shown a profit of 30 handicap points, and David was looking to make a roquet or two to finish his season on a high note.  The others had had enough of the wind and the rain and were sitting in The Steading toasting the new winner.  It was one of the apprentices, and without the need for the final round, because he was two wins ahead of his nearest challenger.  So no-one has yet won this attractive trophy twice.

Malcolm O’Connell, Andy Campbell, Colin Dinwoodie and Charlotte Townsend were the rest of the atelier, and all had good results: Charlotte and Andy both beat John (and this was before his mallet blew high into the branches of the trees, so it can’t have been that which caused his problems); both Andy and Colin disposed of David.  It was good to have such a competitive field the week after it had somehow been impossible to find enough players to hold the Chairman’s Rosebowl and the Malmet Trophy.  Oh, and apart from not playing John, Malcolm beat everybody.

Conditions on the Saturday had been not too bad, though wet enough from time to time that the tent which David had brought was a boon.  However, the wind on the Sunday was enough to bend several of its poles, and it was eventually taken down to protect it from further damage; it might not have been in such peril had we used its guy-ropes, but Saturday had been so still we hardly bothered with tent pegs at all!  Swings were naturally much affected by the wind and shooting became rather a lottery (of course it always is for some of us).  Nevertheless the conditions can’t be blamed for everything, and the standard of play was disappointing.  There were precious few triples even attempted: John got the peels done once but messed up the ending; Rod managed two peels before breaking down; both of them had desultory attempts at straight triples but each missed penult entirely with the peelee.  David, who usually tries such things, was rather prevented from the attempt by his failure to get his first ball to 4-back.

Malcolm played best, didn’t try too many things which were too difficult when the wind was at its height, and deserved to win.  It was also appropriate as he had been one of the three entrants when the tournament was originally planned.  It hardly seems fair to mention that he missed an eighteen inch lift shot.

1996:

The SCA Masters Champion for 1996 is Strat Liddiard, which means that there is still nobody who has won this prestigious title twice.  The title was nearly snatched from Strat’s grasp by a wonder Charlotte shot – running hoop 1 AND hoop 2 AND roqueting partner ball!  Unfortunately, after taking off to Strat’s joined pair, she missed a tiddler!  Always take advantage of a fluke is my advice, and walk towards your ball as though the whole thing was intentional!

17 – 18 May, 1997:

(Report by Rod Williams)

Charlotte Townsend had originally entered but withdrew feeling unwell before the start – very wise, considering the weather over the weekend: rain, wind, cold and rain.  Su Stenhouse also entered, despite feeling unwell, and started gamely on Saturday morning – unwise as it turned out, since this just encouraged the weather to do its worst, and she withdrew after a couple of rounds while still alive, just.

John Surgenor still managed to beat everyone, despite playing well below his best.  Tony Brightman had a good win over Malcolm O’Connell, but still doesn’t play enough to be consistent.  Andy Campbell showed occasional bursts of competence, playing pretty cannily to bear Rod Williams – if he played more croquet and did less fire and curry eating he would also improve significantly.

David Appleton’s attacks of ‘yips’ left him long enough for some of the old skills to re-emerge to beat Tony Brightman; some commentators think his kinky mallet is the cause of his difficulties, but I think it was too much worrying about whether he would be allowed to take early retirement.

1998, at Bush:

(Report by David Appleton)

Hallelujah!  The weather at the Bush was wonderful for the eight entrants in the Masters – for the entire two days.  George Anderson had cut the lawns the previous afternoon and they were playing very well.  With time limit of 2 hrs 20 mins on the Saturday and 2 hrs 30 mins on the Sunday it was possible for everyone to play everyone else (except Tony Brightman called off playing David Appleton, which David thought was a pity as Tony is the only person he has beaten in any competition since September 1996).  Eight of the 27 games went to time, which is indicative that the standard of play was not fantastic.

It was Andy Campbell who was most consistent, beating everyone.  He started well, being round to 4-back in his first game while most of the other players were wondering whether it was about time to try approaching a hoop, and he went round pretty regularly for the rest of the weekend, with the result that his handicap is now down to 2 and approaching 1½.  Malcolm O’Connell was most variable, winning two games on time while on the ‘clips of death’ and trying one outrageous straight triple where he had to cannon the peelee through both 4-back and penult; unfortunately he didn’t manage to get it through rover.  John Surgenor was hardest to beat (so, what else is new?), losing his two games by very narrow margins.  Brian Murdoch beat the people he is supposed to beat, and got somewhere against the others; he is always liable to play some of his best croquet after time has been called!  Brian Durward performed very well with three wins, two against lower handicapped opponents.  Su Stenhouse started slowly, but on the Sunday she was playing well enough to go round on the fourth turn against David Appleton and set about a sixth turn triple which unfortunately fizzled out.  The best that can be said about the other two competitors is that it proved hard to beat Tony before time was called, and David’s leaves (on such occasions as he managed to remember how to take a ball round) were immaculate.  Malcolm suggested that ‘going round’ for David now means roqueting all the balls in a single turn.

Congratulations to Andy, the seventh name on the Masters trophy in the eight years of its existence.

15 – 16 May, 1999 at Bush:

(Report by David Appleton)

Masters Class

Once again there were eight players in the Scottish Masters, so once again it was run as a round robin.  All the games in the first round were over quite quickly and this enabled fairly generous time limits of 2½ hours to be used in all the subsequent rounds.  Only five of the 28 matches went to time; this was usually because an opponent’s ball had been pegged out.

Matchers had been arranged so that in theory they would become closer as the tournament progressed, and to some extent that was true, with the only +1 results happening in round 7.  In theory also, the result was in doubt until the final round: if Rod Williams could beat John Surgenor he could still win (though such were the provisions for tie-breaking, only if David Appleton also beat Charlotte Townsend to make it a three-way tie on 6 games).  In practice, David lost by one, though only after Rod, the only one of John’s opponents to get a ball to 4-back, had made such a hash of his leave that John had already completed his clean sweep without difficulty and been awarded the trophy for the third time.  He also had the only two triples of the weekend and finished with 182 points to his opponents’ 23 – clearly the class act.

It was a pity that Andy Campbell wasn’t there to defend his title, Malcolm O’Connell was in Sonoma, and Brian Murdoch was indisposed – they might have given John a bit more to think about.  Brian had, however, set the hoops – thanks, Brian.  The lawns at Bush in May are still rather slow and John coped with them far better than anyone else.  The most improved player since last year was your reporter who won five more games than he did then!

2000:

No report has been found.  Winner: John Surgenor.  Runner-up: Charlotte Townsend.

19 – 20 May, 2001 at Meadows West:

(Report by Campbell Morrison)

Unfortunately I was cornered at the beginning of the tournament and was unable to think of a reason fast enough why I should not write the tournament report.  I decided I should take my duties seriously and concentrated on trying to spend as much time on the bench as possible, the better to observe other games.

I succeeded magnificently in the task of sitting out – and I can recommend the ploy of playing an air shot on the baulk line in the third turn – but failed to observe much around me.  I missed David Appleton’s straight TP (his first), I missed Gail Curry’s seven victories on the trot and I missed Rod’s three posthumous peels, as I was feeling pretty posthumous myself at that stage.  I did catch – as I was the victim – Charlotte’s 2-back leave brilliantly disguised as a peg and 4-back leave (top tip: always note the position of your opponent’s clips when walking onto the lawn).  I also overheard a committee trying to remember which watch was being used to keep time (by the time the special committee had reached a conclusion it was time by both watches, so they managed to avoid controversy).  There was a fine barbecue on the Sunday, washed down by beer that was only 16 months past its ‘best before’ date, though there didn’t seem to be a problem with the cider where stock turnover – or perhaps tolerance – is no doubt higher.

25 – 26 May, 2002 at Meadows West:

Four players, Chris Dent, Stuart McKendrick, Nigel Gardner and Jamieson Walker played twelve games, two each against all the others, but nobody sent a report.  Chris Dent won with five wins, including one triple peel, losing once to Nigel Gardner; Nigel was second with four wins, losing once to Stuart McKendrick; Stuart was third with three wins and Jamieson Walker brought up the rear.

2003:

No report has been found.  Winner: John Surgenor.  Runner-up: Tony Foster.

2004:

This report is already on the website.

2005:

This report is already on the website.

2006:

This report is already on the website.

2007:

This report is already on the website.

2008:

This report is already on the website.

2009:

This report is already on the website.

2010:

This report is already on the website.

2011:

This report is already on the website.

2012:

This report is already on the website.

 

Results:

1991:     Ian Bond (11 wins) beat Alan Bogle, John Surgenor, David Appleton, Rod Williams, Colin Rogers, Corla van Griethuysen, Malcolm O’Connell, David Warhurst, Fred Mann, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
Alan Bogle (10 wins) beat John Surgenor, David Appleton, Rod Williams, Colin Rogers, Corla van Griethuysen, Malcolm O’Connell, David Warhurst, Fred Mann, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
John Surgenor (8 wins) beat David Appleton, Rod Williams, Colin Rogers, Corla van Griethuysen, David Warhurst, Fred Mann, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
David Appleton (8 wins) beat Rod Williams, Colin Rogers, Corla van Griethuysen, Malcolm O’Connell, David Warhurst, Fred Mann, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
Rod Williams (6 wins) beat Corla van Griethuysen, Malcolm O’Connell, David Warhurst, Fred Mann, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
Colin Rogers (6 wins) beat Rod Williams, Malcolm O’Connell, David Warhurst, Fred Mann, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
Corla van Griethuysen (4 wins) beat Colin Rogers, Malcolm O’Connell, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
Malcolm O’Connell (4 wins) beat John Surgenor, Fred Mann, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
David Warhurst (4 wins) beat Corla van Griethuysen, Malcolm O’Connell, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
Fred Mann (4 wins) beat Corla van Griethuysen, David Warhurst, Alastair Hunter, Colin Dinwoodie
Alastair Hunter (1 win) beat Colin Dinwoodie
Colin Dinwoodie (0 wins)

1992:     David Appleton (7 wins) beat John Surgenor +3tp, Mike Ranshaw +17, Malcolm O'Connell +17tp, Corla van Griethuysen +12, +19, Alastair Hunter +17, +15
John Surgenor (6) beat David Appleton +26, Mike Ranshaw +4, +9,  Malcolm O'Connell +3, Corla van Griethuysen +12, Alastair Hunter +17
Corla van Griethuysen (5) beat John Surgenor +2, Mike Ranshaw +7, Malcolm O'Connell +10, +9, Alastair Hunter +11
Alastair Hunter (5) beat John Surgenor +7, Mike Ranshaw +4, +9, Malcolm O'Connell +4, Corla van Griethuysen +8
Malcolm O'Connell (4) beat John Surgenor +3, David Appleton +25, Mike Ranshaw +8T, Alastair Hunter +6
Mike Ranshaw (3) beat David Appleton +20, Malcolm O'Connell +15, Corla van Griethuysen +8T

1993:     Rod Williams (8 wins) beat John Surgenor, Andy Campbell, Corla van Griethuysen, Allan Ramsay, Jeremy Dyer, Mike Ranshaw, John Surgenor, David Appleton
Mike Ranshaw (7) beat Rod Williams, John Surgenor, Andy Campbell, Allan Ramsay, Jeremy Dyer, Corla van Griethuysen, John Surgenor
John Surgenor (6) beat David Appleton, Andy Campbell, Corla van Griethuysen, Allan Ramsay, Jeremy Dyer, Corla van Griethuysen
David Appleton (6) beat Rod Williams, Mike Ranshaw, Andy Campbell, Allan Ramsay, Jeremy Dyer, Andy Campbell
Corla van Griethuysen (6) beat David Appleton, Mike Ranshaw, Andy Campbell, Allan Ramsay, Jeremy Dyer, Allan Ramsay
Jeremy Dyer (5) beat David Appleton, Andy Campbell, Allan Ramsay, Allan Ramsay, Andy Campbell
Andy Campbell (1) beat Allan Ramsay
Allan Ramsay (0)

1994:     John Surgenor (5 wins) beat Malcolm O'Connell, Mike Ranshaw tp, Colin Dinwoodie, Alastair Hunter, Malcolm O'Connell
Malcolm O'Connell (4) beat Colin Dinwoodie, Mike Ranshaw, Mike Ranshaw, Alastair Hunter
Alastair Hunter (3) beat Mike Ranshaw, John Surgenor, Malcolm O'Connell
Colin Dinwoodie (3) beat Mike Ranshaw, Alastair Hunter, Alastair Hunter
Mike Ranshaw (1) beat Colin Dinwoodie

1995:     Malcolm O'Connell (6 wins) beat Charlotte Townsend, Brian Murdoch, Andy Campbell, Colin Dinwoodie, Rod Williams, David Appleton
John Surgenor (4) beat Brian Murdoch, Colin Dinwoodie, Rod Williams, David Appleton
Andy Campbell (3) beat John Surgenor, Charlotte Townsend, David Appleton
Rod Williams (3) beat Andy Campbell, Colin Dinwoodie, David Appleton
Brian Murdoch (3) beat Rod Williams, Andy Campbell, Charlotte Townsend
Colin Dinwoodie (3) beat Charlotte Townsend, Brian Murdoch, David Appleton
Charlotte Townsend (1) beat John Surgenor
David Appleton (1) beat Charlotte Townsend

1996:     S. Liddiard beat B. Murdoch +3T, C. Townsend +17, D. Appleton +24, F. Mann +26, R. Williams +15
R. Williams beat C. Townsend +5T, D. Appleton +14, F. Mann +22, M. O’Connell +19, T. Brightman +4
M. O’Connell beat B. Murdoch +3T, C. Townsend +15T, D. Appleton +1, F. Mann +19
T. Brightman beat C. Townsend +7T, D. Appleton +11T, M. O’Connell +10
D. Appleton beat B. Murdoch +10, F. Mann +22
B. Murdoch beat F. Mann +22, T. Brightman +9T
C. Townsend beat F. Mann +19

1997:     J. Surgenor beat R. Williams +18, T. Brightman +13, M. O’Connell +20, B. Murdoch +6T, A. Campbell +18, D. Appleton +13
R. Williams beat T. Brightman +1T, M. O’Connell +8T, B. Murdoch +18, D. Appleton +22
T. Brightman beat M. O’Connell +15, B. Murdoch +7T, A. Campbell +16
M. O’Connell beat B. Murdoch +9T, A. Campbell +16, D. Appleton +26
B. Murdoch beat A. Campbell +1T, D. Appleton +4T
A. Campbell beat R. Williams +20, D. Appleton +19
D. Appleton beat T. Brightman +3T

1998:     A. Campbell (7 wins/7) beat M. O’Connell +15, J. Surgenor +4, B. Murdoch +14, B. Durward +21, S. Stenhouse +17, D. Appleton +13, T. Brightman +3T
M. O’Connell (6/7) beat J. Surgenor +1, B. Murdoch +2T, B. Durward +16, S. Stenhouse +23, D. Appleton +9, T. Brightman +2T
J. Surgenor (5/7) beat B. Murdoch +8, B. Durward +11, S. Stenhouse +5T, D. Appleton +9, T. Brightman +24
B. Murdoch (4/7) beat B. Durward, S. Stenhouse +24, D. Appleton +12, T. Brightman +10T
B. Durward (3/7) beat S. Stenhouse +5T, D. Appleton, T. Brightman +12
S. Stenhouse (2/7) beat D. Appleton +9T, T. Brightman +11
T. Brightman (0/6)
D. Appleton (0/6)

1999:    

 

JS

DA

RW

CT

BD

JW

BR

GA

Wins

J. Surgenor

 

+25

+17

+25

+21

+24

+25

+22

7

D. Appleton

-25

 

+2T

-1

+22

+17

+16

+6T

5

R. Williams

-17

-2T

 

+25

+20

+8

+9

+19

5

C. Townsend

-25

+1

-25

 

+10T

-5

+10T

+16

4

B. Durward

-21

-22

-20

-10T

 

+16

+17

+21

3

J. Walker

-24

-17

-8

+5

-16

 

-5

+1T

2

B. Rannie

-25

-16

-9

-10T

-17

+5

 

-4

1

G. Anderson

-22

-6T

-19

-16

-21

-1T

+4

 

1

2000:

 

JS

CT

RW

JW

DA

Wins

J. Surgenor

 

+20

+17

+9

-3

3

C. Townsend

-20

 

+22

-10

+14

2

R. Williams

-17

-22

 

+20

+19

2

J. Walker

-9

+10

-20

 

+1

2

D. Appleton

+3

-14

-19

-1

 

1

2001:   

 

GC

DA

RW

JS

BD

CT

AC

CM

Wins

Gail Curry

 

+17

+9

+11

+5tp

+17

+17

+25

7

David Appleton

-17

 

+25stp

+8

-26

+14

+3T

+22

5

Rod Williams

-9

-25

 

+4

+12

+4

+26tp

+15

5

John Surgenor

-11

-8

-4

 

+26

+14

+20

+23

4

Brian Durward

-5

+26

-12

-26

 

+22

+12T

+21

4

Charlotte Townsend

-17

-14

-4

-14

-22

 

+5T

+15

2

Andy Campbell

-17

-3T

-26

-20

-12T

-5T

 

+8T

1

Campbell Morrison

-25

-22

-15

-23

-21

-15

-8T

 

0

2002:

 

CD

NG

SM

JW

Wins

Chris Dent

 

+22, -16

+8, +14

+26tp, +22

5

Nigel Gardner

-22, +16

 

-16, +7

+11, +3

4

Stuart McKendrick

-8, -14

+16, -7

 

+18, +22

3

Jamieson Walker

-26, -22

-11, -3

-18, -22

 

0

2003:

 

JS

TF

BR

RW

CT

BD

JW

Wins

John Surgenor

 

+7

+5

+25

+12

+3

+11

6

Tony Foster

-7

 

+4

+4

+19

+1

+4

5

Bruce Rannie

-5

-4

 

+14

+15

+23

+18

4

Rod Williams

-25

-4

-14

 

+22

+14

+12

3

Charlotte Townsend

-12

-19

-15

-22

 

+13

+17

2

Brian Durward

-3

-1

-23

-14

-13

 

+19

1

Jamieson Walker

-11

-4

-18

-12

-17

-19

 

0

2004:     Bruce Rannie beat David Appleton +18, Tony Foster +4, Malcolm O'Connell +11
Rod Williams beat Bruce Rannie +6, Malcolm O'Connell +21tp, David Appleton +25
Tony Foster beat Rod Williams +20, Malcolm O'Connell +15
Malcolm O'Connell beat David Appleton +14
David Appleton beat Tony Foster +14
Semi-Finals:  Bruce Rannie beat Tony Foster +10; Malcolm O’Connell beat Rod Williams +21
Final:  Bruce Rannie beat Malcolm O’Connell +22

2005:     Charlotte Townsend (3 wins) beat Bruce Rannie +5, John Surgenor +11, Rod Williams +9
John Surgenor (1) beat Rod Williams +21
Bruce Rannie (1) beat John Surgenor +5
Rod Williams (1) beat Bruce Rannie +14

2006:     Fergus McInnes (4 wins) beat Jamieson Walker +14, David Appleton +4, Tony Brightman +11, Joe Lennon +23
Robert Lay (3) beat Fergus McInnes +23, David Appleton +24, Joe Lennon +21
Jamieson Walker (3) beat Robert Lay +10, Tony Brightman +20, Joe Lennon +3T (19-16)
David Appleton (2) beat Jamieson Walker +15, Joe Lennon +20
Tony Brightman (2) beat David Appleton +2T (21-19), Robert Lay +2T (21-19)
Joe Lennon (1) beat Tony Brightman +1T (24-23)

2007:     Alan Wilson (5 wins) beat James Hopgood +11, Martin Stephenson +1T, Fergus McInnes +16, Joe Lennon +6T, Robert Lay +22
James Hopgood (5) beat Martin Stephenson +2T, Bill Spalding +3T, Fergus McInnes +17, Joe Lennon +13T, Robert Lay +7
Martin Stephenson (4) beat Bill Spalding +5T, Fergus McInnes +13, Joe Lennon +18, Robert Lay +26tp
Bill Spalding (4) beat Alan Wilson +2T, Fergus McInnes +13, Joe Lennon +1T, Robert Lay +20
Fergus McInnes (2) beat Joe Lennon +18, Robert Lay +12
Joe Lennon (1) beat Robert Lay +20
Robert Lay (0)

2008:     James Hopgood (5 wins) beat Fergus McInnes +20, Jane Shorten +16, Campbell Morrison +12, Martin Stephenson +22, Alan Wilson +26tp
Fergus McInnes (5) beat Brian Murdoch +3, Jane Shorten +13, Campbell Morrison +15, Alan Wilson +3T, Joe Lennon +24
Brian Murdoch (4) beat James Hopgood +8T, Martin Stephenson +9, Tony Whateley +13, Jamieson Walker +2T
Jane Shorten (4) beat Alan Wilson +15, Joe Lennon +23, Tony Whateley +10, Jamieson Walker +21
Campbell Morrison (4) beat Brian Murdoch +1T, Martin Stephenson +18, Joe Lennon +26tp, Jamieson Walker +23
Martin Stephenson (3) beat Alan Wilson +19, Joe Lennon +12, Tony Whateley +6
Alan Wilson (2) beat Tony Whateley +18, Jamieson Walker +13
Joe Lennon (2) beat Tony Whateley +3, Jamieson Walker +10
Tony Whateley (1) beat Jamieson Walker +1T
Jamieson Walker (0)

2009:     James Hopgood (7 wins) beat Joe Lennon +25tp, Jamieson Walker +12, Bryan Sykes +16tp, Malcolm O'Connell +19tp, Alan Wilson +24tp, Bill Spalding +15T, John Surgenor +25
Bryan Sykes (6) beat Bill Spalding +8, Alan Wilson +1T, Jamieson Walker +5, John Surgenor +19tp, Joe Lennon +7, Malcolm O'Connell +16
Alan Wilson (4) beat John Surgenor +13, Joe Lennon +15, Jamieson Walker +26, Bill Spalding +5T
Bill Spalding (4) beat Malcolm O'Connell +14, Joe Lennon +19, John Surgenor +14T, Jamieson Walker +11
Malcolm O'Connell (3) beat Alan Wilson +14, Joe Lennon +26, John Surgenor +6T
Jamieson Walker (2) beat John Surgenor +14, Malcolm O'Connell +15
John Surgenor (1) beat Joe Lennon +22
Joe Lennon (1) beat Jamieson Walker +5T

2010:     James Hopgood (8/9) beat Jamieson Walker +7, Alan Wilson +2T (22-20), Bill Spalding +25, Tony Whateley +24, Fergus McInnes +25, Bryan Sykes +14, Joe Lennon +26, Bill Spalding +19tp
Fergus McInnes (5/6) beat Bryan Sykes +3T (17-14), Joe Lennon +17, Martin Stephenson +1T (22-21), Alan Wilson +5, Jola Jurasinska +15
Alan Wilson (5/7) beat Bill Spalding +21, Tony Whateley +20, Bryan Sykes +19, Joe Lennon +24, Martin Stephenson +1
Martin Stephenson (5/7) beat Tony Whateley +1T (18-17), Bryan Sykes +4, Joe Lennon +13, Jola Jurasinska +17, James Hopgood +26tp
Jamieson Walker (4/6) beat Jola Jurasinska +6T (20-14), Tony Whateley +2T (21-19), Bryan Sykes +17, Joe Lennon +8
Bill Spalding (3/6) beat Jamieson Walker +4T (20-16), Jola Jurasinska +23, Tony Whateley +15
Joe Lennon (2/7) beat Jola Jurasinska +5T (18-13), Bryan Sykes +5
Bryan Sykes (1/7) beat Tony Whateley +6
Tony Whateley (1/7) beat Jola Jurasinska +5
Jola Jurasinska (0/6)

2011:     First round:
James Hopgood beat Jane Morrison +22
Sam Murray beat Jerry Guest +15
Fergus McInnes beat George Noble +1
Martin Stephenson beat Malcolm O'Connell +20
Graham Brightwell beat Alan Wilson +2T
Campbell Morrison beat Jamieson Walker +16
Quarter-finals: 
James Hopgood beat Sam Murray +21
Martin Stephenson beat Fergus McInnes +8
Matt Holmes beat Ian Vincent +23
Campbell Morrison beat Graham Brightwell +17
Semi-finals:  
James Hopgood beat Martin Stephenson +22, +25tp
Campbell Morrison beat Matt Holmes +17, +19
Final: 
James Hopgood beat Campbell Morrison +16tp, +14

Swiss games (main event games carried forward in count): 
Matt Holmes winner, Graham Brightwell runner-up
Matt Holmes beat Graham Brightwell +10, Alan Wilson +15, George Noble +19
Graham Brightwell beat Jamieson Walker +12, Fergus McInnes +17, James Hopgood +11
George Noble beat Malcolm O'Connell +20, Ian Vincent +16, Martin Stephenson +26, Sam Murray +9
Jane Morrison beat Jerry Guest +8, Fergus McInnes +18, George Noble +21tp
Sam Murray beat Malcolm O'Connell +23, Fergus McInnes +1T, Alan Wilson +9
Ian Vincent beat Sam Murray +26tp, Malcolm O'Connell +24, Jane Morrison +18tp
Jerry Guest beat Jamieson Walker +5, Ian Vincent +15
Malcolm O'Connell beat Alan Wilson +17, Jamieson Walker +19
Martin Stephenson beat Jerry Guest +5, Jane Morrison +17
James Hopgood beat Jerry Guest +18tp
Fergus McInnes beat Alan Wilson +13
Jamieson Walker beat Fergus McInnes +7T
Alan Wilson beat Jamieson Walker +6

2012:     Seven-round Swiss, ten players
Campbell Morrison (7 wins) beat Fergus McInnes +16, Alan Wilson +16, Robert Inder +23tp, Jane Morrison +17, Bill Spalding +25, John Surgenor +14, Martin Stephenson +9
Jane Morrison (6) beat Bill Spalding +22, Robert Inder +5T (13-8), Robert Lay +22, John Surgenor +21, Martin Stephenson +2T (21-19), Joe Lennon +26
Bill Spalding (5) beat Martin Stephenson +21, Joe Lennon +17, John Surgenor +5T (16-11), Fergus McInnes +17, Robert Lay +23
John Surgenor (4) beat Martin Stephenson +9T (24-15), Joe Lennon +25, Alan Wilson +1T (22-21), Robert Inder +5T (23-18)
Martin Stephenson (3) beat Fergus McInnes +8T (25-17), Robert Lay +17, Alan Wilson +7
Alan Wilson (3) beat Joe Lennon +21, Robert Inder +1T (22-21), Robert Lay +24
Robert Inder (3) beat Robert Lay +23, Fergus McInnes +10T (23-13), Joe Lennon +10T (22-12)
Fergus McInnes (2) beat Joe Lennon +21, Alan Wilson +1T (23-22)
Joe Lennon (1) beat Robert Lay +7T (17-10)
Robert Lay (1) beat Fergus McInnes +3T (14-11)