Chairman's Rosebowl

Trophy:  A Silver Rosebowl donated by R.O. Calder.

The Chairman’s Rosebowl is an invitation event for the six best available players in the SCA.  It is played under advanced rules and usually held towards the end of the season.  The competitors play each other twice in a three-day weekend tournament.

Roll of honour:

 

Winner

Other competitors

1978       

S.J.H. Wright

D. Nichols, R.N. Maclean, R. ap W. Williams,
S.R.C. Malin, J.G. White

1979       

R.N. Maclean
           (7 games)

W.M. Spalding 7, F.V.X. Norton 6, E. Mackenzie-Bowie 6, I.H. Wright 4, R. ap W. Williams 0

1980       

I.H. Wright
         (10 games)

W.M. Spalding 7, C.A. Rowe 5, S.R.C. Malin 4,
M. Lauder 2, R.O. Calder 2

1981       

W.M. Spalding
           (9 games)

E. Mackenzie-Bowie 8, R. ap W. Williams 5,
M. Lauder 4, C.A. Rowe 2, M.P.W. Smith 2

1982       

W.M. Spalding
           (9 games)

A.H.M. Adam 8, S.R.C. Malin 5,
A.G.M Hunter 3, I.H. Wright 3, C.A. Rowe 2

1983       

W.M. Spalding
           (6 games)

N. Hyne 5, R. ap W. Williams 4,
F.V.X. Norton 3, A.H.M. Adam 2

1984       

R. ap W. Williams
           (8 games)

W.M. Spalding 7, F.V.X. Norton 5, G. Strutt 4,
J. Surgenor 4, A.G.M. Hunter 2

1985       

W.M. Spalding
           (9 games)

R. ap W. Williams 9, E. Mackenzie-Bowie 5,
I.H. Wright 4, F.V.X. Norton 3, G. Anderson 0

1986       

J. Surgenor
           (9 games)

R. ap W. Williams 8, I.H. Wright 6,
M.P.W. Smith 4, G. Anderson 2, F.V.X. Norton 1

1987       

J. Surgenor
           (8 games)

G. Anderson  6, D.S. Warhurst 5, A.H.M. Adam 4, R. ap W. Williams 4, C.M. van Griethuysen 3

1988       

J. Surgenor
           (7 games)

R. ap W. Williams 6, D.R. Appleton 6, C.M. van Griethuysen 5, G. Anderson 3, I.H. Wright 3

1989       

J. Surgenor
           (7 games)

D.R. Appleton 6, M. Gill 6, R. ap W. Williams 5, C.M. van Griethuysen 5, G. Anderson 1

1990       

R. ap W. Williams
           (7 games)

D.R. Appleton 7, J. Surgenor 6, C.M. van Griethuysen 4, M.J. O’Connell 4, D.S. Warhurst 2

1991       

R. ap W. Williams
           (8 games)

D.R. Appleton 6, J. Surgenor 6, C. Rogers 4,
M.J. O’Connell 4, C.M. van Griethuysen 2

1992       

R. ap W. Williams
           (8 games)

J. Surgenor 7, J. Dyer 6, M. Ranshaw 4,
C. Rogers 3, D.R. Appleton 2

1993       

J. Surgenor
         (10 games)

J. Dyer 8, M.J. O’Connell 5, R. ap W. Williams 2, M. Ranshaw 2, D.R. Appleton 2

1994       

J. Surgenor
           (9 games)

M. Ranshaw 6, M.J. O’Connell 6, C. Dinwoodie 4, A.J. Campbell 3, A.G.M. Hunter 0

1995       

not played

 

1996       

R. ap W. Williams
           (9 games)

B.R.P. Murdoch 8, B.M. Rannie 5, C.M.  Townsend 5, D.R. Appleton 2, N.T. Gardner 1

1997       

M.J. O’Connell
           (9 games)

R. ap W. Williams 7, B.R.P. Murdoch 6, B.M. Rannie 3, C.M. Townsend 3, S.A.R. Stenhouse 2

1998       

M.J. O’Connell
           (8 games)

J. Surgenor 7, R. ap W. Williams 5, A.J. Campbell 4, B.R.P. Murdoch 3, B.R. Durward 3

1999       

M.J. O’Connell
           (9 games)

A.J. Campbell 6, J. Surgenor 5, B.R.P. Murdoch 4, D.R. Appleton 3, R. ap W. Williams 2

2000       

P.J. Kirby
           (7 games)

J. Surgenor 4, R ap W. Williams 3, D.R. Appleton 3, B.R.P. Murdoch 1

2001       

R. ap W. Williams
           (7 games)

B.M. Rannie 6, D.R. Appleton 5, C.M. Townsend 5, D.P. Arnot 4, C.I. Morrison 3

2002       

P.J. Kirby
         (10 games)

J. Surgenor 7, B.M. Rannie 7, R. ap W. Williams 3, F.R. McInnes 2, C.I. Morrison 1

2003       

J. Surgenor
           (7 games)

B.R.P. Murdoch 7, B.M. Rannie 6, R. ap W. Williams 6, D.R. Appleton 3, D.P. Arnot 1

2004       

R. ap W. Williams
           (9 games)

J. Surgenor 7, B.R.P. Murdoch 5, A.C. Brightman 4, D.R. Appleton 3, A.A. Wilson 2

2005       

F.R. McInnes
           (9 games)

D.R. Appleton 8, M.A. Stephenson 5, C.M. Townsend 4, J. Walker 3, M.J. O’Connell 1

2006       

D.R. Appleton
           (6 games)

M.A. Stephenson 6, R. ap W. Williams 6, J.R. Hopgood 6, F.R. McInnes 5, B.C. Sykes 1

2007       

D.R. Appleton
           (8 games)

J.R. Hopgood 8, F.R. McInnes 5, M.A. Stephenson 4, R.A. Hawke 2, T. Foster 2

2008       

B.M. Rannie
         (10 games)

J.R. Hopgood 6, M.A. Stephenson 6, B.R.P. Murdoch 5, D.R. Appleton 2, F.R. McInnes 1

2009       

J.R. Hopgood
           (8 games)

B.R.P. Murdoch 6, M.A. Stephenson 6, M.J. O’Connell 5, A.A. Wilson 5, W.M. Spalding 0

2010       

J.R. Hopgood
         (10 games)

B.R.P. Murdoch 6, M.A. Stephenson 5, A.A. Wilson 3, J. Morrison 3, F.R. McInnes 3

2011       

J.R. Hopgood
         (10 games)

C.I. Morrison 8, J. Morrison 6, B.C. Sykes 4, M.A. Stephenson 2, A.A. Wilson 0

2012       

J.R. Hopgood
          (9 games)

J. Morrison 6, M.A. Stephenson 6, C.I. Morrison 5, B.C. Sykes 3, A.A. Wilson 1

 

Reports:

1978:

No report has been found.  Stephen Wright won, Dave Nichols, Bob Maclean, Rod Williams, Stuart Malin and Jim White finished in that order.

14 – 16 September, 1979, Edinburgh

Three days of mixed weather made the event similar to much of Scottish croquet as it has been this summer.  Friday was windy and became very chilly in the late afternoon, Saturday was pleasant and even warm when the sun shone, but Sunday was mixed with showers of rain.  The court at Morningside, where double banked games were played, was in excellent condition, but Lauriston was somewhat unkempt.  Players moving from one venue to the other found difficulty in adjusting to the different pace and characteristics of the courts. 

It might have been expected that, coming towards the end of the season, the competition would have found the players at the peak of their form.  It turned out however, that the reverse seemed to be the case.  Jack Norton said that he felt he was suffering from a surfeit of croquet and Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie was heard to remark that he was finding it difficult to work up any enthusiasm for his games.  There were certainly more moderate-length missed shots and more breakdowns of experienced breaks than one expected from the best six available players.  No triple peels were completed although one attempt by Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie failed only at the peg out.

With Rod Williams completely off form and failing to win any of his games, it was a close race between the other five.  At the halfway stage when everyone had played five games Bob Maclean was leading with 4 wins while Bill Spalding, Ian Wright and Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie had 3 wins each.   Jack Norton had beaten Bob Maclean but his only other win was against Rod Williams.

By the time the last game of the second series was reached an interesting situation had developed.  Bob Maclean was in the lead with 7 wins out of 9 games and was due to play Jack Norton who had by now accumulated five wins and considered himself a contender for second place.  Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie with 5 wins was also in contention for second place and was due to play Ian Wright, while Bill Spalding with 6 wins and playing Rod Williams saw the possibility of a tie for first place.  The Maclean-Norton match was at Morningside and the Spalding-Williams contest at Lauriston so the players had no knowledge of what was happening in the other game. 

Bob Maclean, who had probably showed the steadiest form over the three days, was looking tired as he started his last game while Jack Norton still seemed as cheerful and full of vigour as he had been at the beginning of the event.  Bob had indeed lost his form and Jack won the game by +17.  At Lauriston Rod did his best to salvage one game from the wreck of his weekend but Bill was the winner by +5.

And so a play off was necessary to determine first place and the winner of the Rosebowl.  As the schedule for the event cannot allow time for the possibility of a play off, it was left to Bob and Bill to arrange the deciding game.  In the play off Bob beat Bill +12.  Bob was hitting in well but seemed to be playing poorly insofar as his croquet strokes were concerned.  On several occasions his own ball went badly off-line but he was always able to retrieve the situation by hitting a long roquet to maintain the break, or lay up safely.  And so, Bob Maclean, in his second year as Chairman of the Association and after a successful South African tour in which he won all his singles games in the two Test Matches, crowned his success by holding the Chairman’s Trophy for the next twelve months.

19 – 21 September, 1980, Edinburgh

The Chairman’s Rosebowl – Scotland’s answer to the President’s Cup – was contested by six invited players.  Everyone played each of the others twice, being deemed to have won the toss for one game and lost it for the other; making a total of ten advanced games for each player.  Since only nine games could be played in the three days, every player had one game during the preceding week.  None of these preliminaries produced any great surprises, though Ian Wright was glad to scrape through by 4 against Bill Spalding and Stuart Malin had a similar narrow win against Bob Calder.  On Friday, every game went to the lower handicapped player, though Ian Wright had another narrow squeak when Carol Rowe pegged him out and only lost to him by 5.  He found his form later in the day, though, beating Margaret Lauder by 20 and Stuart Malin by 26, including an unsuccessful attempt at a triple peel.

Friday’s sunshine had seemed too good to be true and so it proved, with the remainder of the tournament cloaked in Scotch mist; indeed on Sunday it was barely possible to see across the lawns.  The moist grass provided an accurate record of every shot and much time was spent on showing the opposition how one had been robbed of a long hit-in that had started right / curled across the target line / missed by a whisker (delete where inapplicable).  Bad shots were easily deleted by shuffling along their track when retrieving the ball from the boundary.

Carol Rowe played particularly well on Saturday (though he claimed that it was purely chivalry that led him twice to present her with the innings by blobbing hoops off her ball after pegging her other one out).  She then convincingly beat Bob Calder was in the process of doing the same to Stuart Malin when fate took a hand.  She had one ball on 4-back and, with her opponent’s balls both on hoop 4, she took her other ball to the peg, leaving herself a safe rush, and the other two balls almost perfectly cross-wired at the peg.  Stuart, smarting from a second 26-0 trouncing from Ian Wright (who had come within an ace of competing his first-ever tournament triple before his final rush to the peg fouled the rover hoop), hit the quarter-inch of ball showing round the peg, went round and pegged out not only Carol’s ball, as he intended, but also his own.  With a six-hoop lead and only three to go, the two-ball game should have been Carol’s, but it nearly entered the Guinness Book of Records by ending in a draw when both players, cross-wire at 4-back, deemed their strokes played.  Stuart would gladly have accepted a draw at that stage, little realising that, by dint of some lucky long approaches, he was eventually to win by 1!

Ian Wright also had a good Saturday; besides his near-triple, he also had a good win over Bob Calder during which he impertinently ignored Bob’s wide join until he had completed a two-ball break from hoop 1 to 2-back.  His unbeaten record was in grave peril when he played Margaret Lauder when he just scraped home by four after being pegged out.  In all, Margaret had six games in which the margin was less than ten, and was unlucky to end up winning only two of them.

The final day went largely as expected, though Carol Rowe only narrowly failed to repeat her victory over Bill Spalding.  It was solely because of this earlier defeat that Bill was no longer in contention when he and Ian played the final game, but the Rosebowl was not all that was at stake, as Ian had his 100% record to defend, and Bill, who has triple-peeled in a tournament, was not going down without a fight.  Bill started brilliantly by hitting a fourth-turn tice and going round to 4-back, but thereafter he did not take croquet.  Ian admitted that he had a certain amount of luck in this game, and no-one who saw him splitting to within an inch of the boundary (at least twice) and hitting in with a fortuitous ten-yard roquet would argue with that!

The Rosebowl was convincingly and worthily won by Ian Wright with ten wins, Bill Spalding came second with seven and Carol Rowe was third with five.  Ian Wright also managed the tournament, performing miracles of organisation to ensure an equitable distribution of double banking, travel between Morningside and Lauriston, and games on the two lawns.  Despite, or perhaps because of, the absence of time limits, there was remarkably little hanging about between games, and play finished well before the light faded each day.  The ten game format makes for a very full and enjoyable weekend of croquet and it is hoped that it will continue that way.

19 – 21 September, 1981, Edinburgh

The meteorological aspects of an autumn tournament are always of interest.  In this event, each of the six invited players must play off one game in advance and then play three games each day over the long weekend whatever the weather may bring.  Saturday was sunny and even warm at times until the late evening when the autumn chill descended.  Overnight there was heavy rain leaving the courts waterlogged, but a gale force wind soon drove off the superfluous moisture and proved unbalancing to the players all day.  Monday was once again mild and pleasant.

Bill Spalding fulfilled one forecast by continuing fair with the possibility of slight shows when a defeat by Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie in the first round spoilt his otherwise spotless record.  Ewen subjected his opponents to sudden outbursts of thundery rain as he struck unexpectedly, gave them a heavy soaking, and then petered out, only to strike again later.  Rod Williams, having lost four of his first round games, sent out a gale warning of his intention to cause more trouble in the second round, which he did by winning all of his second round games apart from that against Bill.

A long range forecast might predict that players would beat others of worse handicap and lose to those of higher ranking.  Margaret Lauder was the only one to fulfil such a forecast, her play being as steady as a barometer in settled weather.  While in no way describing the quality of Carol Rowe’s personality or her play, her results could have been said to be dull with sunny intervals, the bright spells being her two wins over Rod Williams and Malcolm Smith.  Malcolm, feeling optimistic after his early victory over Rod, became engulfed in a deep depression as he lost game after game, beating only Carol to tie with her at the foot of the list.

It may in fact have been the weather conditions on Sunday which contributed to a lack of any outstandingly good play such as one hopes to see in this event.  Bill, Ewen and Rod all embarked on triple peels, but none succeeded, the nearest to completion being Ewen’s against Malcolm in which the rover peel was successfully accomplished, but Ewen’s own ball rolled to a virtually impossible position from which, despite a desperate attempt, the hoop was not scored. 

Bill Spalding’s record of nine wins with only one defeat makes him a worthy winner of the Rosebowl while Ewen’s eight wins show how tight it is at the top.  It might have been tighter if Rod Williams had not lost his form until Sunday afternoon.

18 – 20 September, 1982, Edinburgh

The competition was held this year at Lauriston, using No. 1 lawn and a second full-size lawn in the area of No. 2 and No. 3 lawns.  This arrangement, although the best available, provide further cause for concern that we do not have club facilities adequate for tournament croquet.  As several players were unavailable, two players who have not previously played in this event took part, and this introduced unpredictability into the results.  That one of these, Alasdair Adam, was runner-up, and the only person to beat the winner, shows how justified his inclusion was.

The games were played over three days from 18th to 20th September, with three games each day (one game was played earlier).  The weather was generally fine although there were occasional very heavy showers which added variety of the playing conditions.  By the end of the first day, only Alasdair Adam was undefeated having played steadily after the failure of a couple of TP attempts by Bill Spalding to win that game by 4.  On the second day, the scores were levelled when Stuart Malin narrowly defeated Alasdair by 5.  Alastair Hunter, having played very few open games, was experimenting with tactics, and, despite or because of this, had two good wins.  Ian Wright was having trouble with his shoulder, but least happy was Carol Rowe, without a win to date.

The third day opened with what proved to be the deciding match in which Bill gained revenge in beating Alasdair by 16.  In his second game against Alastair Hunter, Bill was dismayed when, having completed the three peels of the triple, his ball rolled on and just touched his partner ball lying four feet beyond rover, when the peg out would have been simple using the third ball which was lying adjacent.  Bill still won the game however.

Undeterred by this defeat, Alastair Hunter immediately went to the peg in his final game with Alasdair Adam, but this experiment failed when he was pegged out, and despite several very narrow misses, did not gain the innings until only two balls were left on the lawn.  Meanwhile Carol had decided that she did not like losing and had two good victories on the final day.  In the fading light, Alasdair Adam beat Stuart Malin in the final match, before Stuart flew out to Trieste – we are sorry that Stuart is leaving Edinburgh, but hope that we may see him playing croquet in the future.

1983:

No report has been found.  With five players only, Bill Spalding won six games, Nick Hyne five, Rod Williams four, Jack Norton three and Alasdair Adam two.

1984:

No report has been found, but the scores have been found in Glasgow Club records.  In the Preliminary Round, Rod Williams beat John Surgenor +5, Bill Spalding beat Geoff Strutt +12 and Alastair Hunter beat Jack Norton +22.  The actual weekend was 22 to 24 September. 

Saturday saw three wins for Rod, two each for Geoff and Jack, one each for John and Bill, with Alastair losing all three.  After the first round on Sunday, the halfway point showed Rod unbeaten with five wins, Jack had three, Alastair had lost all four but had his preliminary round win, and the others had two each.

The reverse matches on the Sunday afternoon and Monday saw Rod win the trophy by winning his first eight games, but lose his last two, while Bill won all five to claim runner-up spot on seven.

Jack Norton ended with five wins, Geoff Strutt and John Surgenor four each, and Alastair Hunter two.

1985:

The 1985 Chairman’s Rosebowl, run from 21 to 23 September, was memorable for several reasons.  The most notable one was the weather – it was foul.  On Saturday it rained almost all the time, and it was windy – sometimes the rain was light, sometimes it was very heavy, but it was always raining; on Sunday there was no wind, but the rain started fine and penetrating, and gradually got more persistent as the day progressed; Monday was glorious by comparison, as the rain stopped by lunchtime and the sun shone for fully five minutes. 

The second memorable reason was the Glasgow Marathon which started at Glasgow Green on the Sunday morning.  This meant that there was no possibility of getting to the courts that day, so the event had to be moved to Bush Croquet Club, near Edinburgh, for the Sunday only.  As it was, getting through the barriers to the courts in Glasgow on the Saturday and the Monday mornings was quite a test of initiative. 

And the third thing which made this year’s event a memorable one was the way that Rod Williams and Bill Spalding remorselessly ploughed their way through the opposition until they met for the second time in the final game of the tournament.

The six invited to compete in this tournament play each other twice a total of ten games each.  In order to fit all the games into the three days they each play one game beforehand.  Rod Williams and Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie each arrived on the Saturday one game up, but Bill Spalding and Jack Norton had been unable to play their first game because Jack was unexpectedly in London most of the previous week.

The first round of games on the Saturday got off to a good start; Rod Williams and Ian Wright had fairly comfortable wins, but Bill Spalding just managed to scrape home against Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie by two points; this turned out to be the closest game of the weekend, and the only close game that day.  By the end of the day Rod Williams and Bill Spalding were the only players who were still undefeated.  George Anderson, who had stepped in as reserve, had the added disadvantage of playing with a new mallet, quite different in its characteristics from his usual one which had broken a few days earlier, and he still had to break his duck.

On Sunday morning the texture of the grass was quite different at Bush, but players soon adjusted.  At least there was a comfortable lounge at lunch and teatime, and the players could eat with their wet waterproofs off.  By the end of the first round, everyone had played each other once (except Bill and Jack), and so the most interesting game was that between Bill Spalding and Rod Williams, both still undefeated.  This was a real struggle with both players making their share of mistakes, and lasting long after the other two first round games had finished.  In the end Rod prevailed by four points.  In the other games, Jack Norton beat George Anderson by +9, and Ian Wright beat Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie by +4.

In contrast to his morning game, Bill Spalding beat Jack Norton very quickly, but only +12, so they were able to catch up with the others by starting their preliminary game.  This was also quick, both players having good breaks, and Bill just got home by four points.  On the next court, Rod and Ian were having an equally close encounter.  Rod tried to peg out when Ian was on 2-back and peg, but missed with the croqueted ball.  Ian hit in and set out to catch up while Rod continued to miss the peg by a fraction of an inch each time.  Finally, when Ian had just got to rover and was laid up nicely for it, Rod hit in and finished it off.

On Monday morning, play was back at Glasgow in the midst of squads dismantling marquees and clearing up all the mess left by the marathon in the rain.  In the first round, Ian tried to start a triple in his game against Jack, and paid the penalty of destroying a perfectly well-established break, finally losing the game.  Bill, on the same court at the same time, tried a triple against George, with the same result, but at least he managed to keep the initiative to win the game.

By now, the contrast was clearly between Bill and Rod, with Rod one game up. In the first afternoon round, Ian nearly intervened by beating Bill, but Bill hit the last lift shot to win +6.  Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie and Ian Wright started the final round each with four wins, so Ewen took third place with an easy victory.  Before their last game started, Rod had won all nine with a net score of 109 points; Bill had won eight with net 98.  So Rod had just to win to keep the Rosebowl, while Bill had to win by at least six to regain it.  Rod started off well, soon having a clip on 4-back, but with his next ball he stuck at 1-back.  He just had to get that ball to the peg to be safe, but Bill got the innings and took his first ball to 4-back.  Then, with one of his careful steady breaks, he got his second ball from hoop 2 to the peg.  Rod missed the lift, and a turn or two later Bill finished off to win by +11 and recapture the trophy which Rod had taken from him in 1984.

1986:

The Chairman’s Rosebowl is an event for the six best available players in Scotland, and is played over three days, when each contender plays the others twice.  This year it was played in Glasgow from 27 to 29 September.  Unfortunately last year’s winner Bill Spalding was not able to defend his title, so the favourites were Rod Williams, last year’s runner-up, and Ian Wright, who had started to play well again this year.  There had already been one play-off round before the weekend so that each player just had nine games to play.  These early games had been won by Malcolm Smith, Rod Williams and Ian Wright.  Play started at 10.00 in drizzling rain, but soon that cleared up and stayed away so that it was not too cold.

The Saturday went as expected: in the first two rounds, Rod Williams, John Surgenor and Ian Wright beat their opponents quite comfortably, although George Anderson put up a good fight, keeping his margins of loss quite narrow.  The third round was different, as Rod played Ian, winning quite easily, George had his third close game, losing eventually to Malcolm Smith, and John beat Jack Norton by a single-figure margin.  So after the first day Rod had four wins, and John and Ian were a game behind.

On Sunday George scored his first victory, beating Jack, who was starting to shape up quite handsomely, running Malcolm close and then beating Ian in the last round.  John was in the best shape at the end of the day, beating Ian +14, and then Rod +23.  So Monday dawned with a shared first position between Rod Williams and John Surgenor, each with 6 out of 7, with Ian Wright third, followed by Malcolm Smith, Jack Norton and George Anderson.  Rod needed to beat Ian Wright, and win his other two games by large margins to keep up with John, who had to play the other three.

On Monday, John was in excellent form, despite some slight hiccups, and he convincingly beat George, Jack and Ian.  Rod lost to Ian by 14, and finished with a very close and exciting game against Malcolm, winning +2 after Malcolm had pegged Rod’s ball out, but forgot about giving away the 4-back lift. 

So John Surgenor finished up a worthy winner, losing only one game in the tournament, and winning nine in a row over the weekend.  All but two of his wins were by double-figure margins, his safety play being more than a match for the more attacking styles of the other main contenders.  Rod Williams was one game behind him, losing once each to John and Ian.

26 – 28 September, 1987, at Glasgow Green:

A mild and sunny Saturday encouraged several passers-by in Glasgow Green to stop and while away the odd half hour trying to fathom out the intricacies off double banked croquet.  One of the Green’s wifeys came to sit on the edge of the lawn early on Saturday and became so interested she stayed until shortly before dusk.  However the standard of play in the opening games was not high; our principal supporter, to no-one’s surprise, fell over and went to sleep after a couple of hours of supping Carlsberg and watching botched breaks.  It was hardly representative of the best croquet Scotland can produce, and it eventually became clear that time limits would be necessary, so after the first round all games were limited to three hours.

Even so, the final games on Saturday were played in the dark.  This helped Alasdair Adam finish off Rod Williams by three on time, since Rod had failed to anticipate the need to increase his diet of carrots for the weekend; he should have known better.  John Surgenor and David Warhurst sensibly agreed to peg their game down and start up early on Sunday morning; John won it by three inside twenty minutes.

At the end of Saturday’s games John Surgenor was the only unbeaten player, with George Anderson running close, having lost just one game to Rod Williams.  Rod however had slipped badly, being unable to reproduce his form of earlier in the season.  The timed games produced some exciting finishes.  Corla van Griethuysen, with the innings and two ahead at time, had just given away an easy lift.  Alasdair Adam then took 2-back and 3-back, and rolled up to 4-back leaving himself a ‘dolly rush’.  Corla missed; Alasdair clunked off the upright; Corla missed again; this time Alasdair didn’t mess it up, winning +1 on time.

Sunday brought more of our regular spectators, and John’s first defeat – to George Anderson on time.  John, on 4-back and peg, missed an easy lift against George on 4-back and rover.  George failed the hoop; John hit the long shot but took off short and missed.  On his time turn, George went to the peg with his backward ball, leaving John as long a lift shot as possible; John hit again but failed to convert - +2 to George.  The new spectators, not impressed, also fell asleep. 

Sunday afternoon produced Corla’s first win, over David Warhurst, in a good game of long breaks and good leaves.  The standard of play improved generally – Corla lost to John because she missed a lift (and, of course, because John produced two all-round breaks!).  Rod failed to produce the three-ball triple needed to beat David Warhurst after time.

Monday arrived with John needing two wins to ensure victory.  He was helped by George Anderson, his main rival, easing the pressure by losing to David Warhurst.  George, a few hoops behind, was playing cautiously, thinking he had thirty minutes to go; unfortunately time was only thirty seconds away and it was too late to change his mind and attack.  John was still kept on his toes, however, in two close games: one +9 against Rod Williams, playing more like his old self, the other +3 on time against David Warhurst, who played carelessly when time was called, going for a tricky 2-back, so giving away an easy lift shot.

In the final games on Monday afternoon everyone seemed to be playing well.  George was on 4-back and peg against John in the seventh turn, John then hitting the vital lift.  He was unable to get proper control of his break, and George hit in to finish it off quickly.  Alasdair proved that he can finish games quickly by polishing off David Warhurst +24 before time, and Corla ran Rod very close in a tense three ball finish.

So John Surgenor, winning eight of his ten games, deservedly won the Rosebowl this year, with a judicious mixture of accurate shooting and cautious play.  George Anderson, the runner-up, has now added more tactical guile to his accurate hitting, and was the one player over the weekend who played consistently well.  Most others were far too erratic, although all had patches of playing above themselves.  The standard improved over the course of the weekend – five out of eight games went to time on Sunday, but only two on Monday.  We even managed to finish in broad daylight on Monday for a change!

1988:

No report has been found.  John Surgenor won 7 games, Rod Williams 6, David Appleton 6, Corla van Griethuysen 5, George Anderson 3 and Ian Wright 3.

23 – 25 September, 1989:

(Report by Rod Williams)

Once again sheer consistency won the day.  For the fourth year in succession John Surgenor took the SCA’s premier event, the Chairman’s Rosebowl, with his typically tenacious style.  Although not a spectacular player, he hits in when it matters and plays especially well under pressure.  Joint runners-up were David Appleton and newcomer Martin Gill, who has improved by leaps and bounds over the past season.  Martin had particularly impressive wins against Rod Williams, the tournament handicapper – this had the expected effect at the end of the tournament.  David is probably the most (over?-) ambitious player in the tournament, but on this occasion his attempts at triples never quite came off, although twice he managed all three peels.  A slightly more cautious approach would, I am sure, have produced more wins, but then it wouldn’t be nearly so much fun to watch!

Rod started off the competition, winning his first four games convincingly, including the tournament’s only triple peel in his third game, against George Anderson.  He narrowly lost his fifth game to Martin Gill and tailed off after that, never recovering the consistency of his earlier play.  Corla van Griethuysen managed the tournament with her customary skill and also performed well on the lawns; her five wins, including at least two taken by hitting the ‘last shot’ put her in joint fourth place with Rod.  George had a disappointing weekend, never really finding his touch especially when it came to hoop running, and even his legendary hitting in deserted him for much of the time.

The general standard of the tournament was higher than ever before; more seriously attempted triples, more games finished from non-trivial positions and more breaks picked up from the traditional ‘nowhere’.  Some excellent players, who would reasonably have expected to play in this event, were relegated to the Malmet Trophy; it augurs well for the future of Scottish croquet.

22 – 24 September, 1990:

(Report by Malcolm O’Connell)

The Chairman’s Rosebowl was held this year on Glasgow Green.  The competition is advanced singles play and six players play each other, and then play each other again, to give ten games each.  It is played over three days, which involves everyone in playing their first round tie beforehand.

Prologue

I played David Appleton at Bush on the Friday before, but despite careful arrangements we did not get started until after 6pm; this is not a good idea in Scotland in September, and as we both played like dafties (1-back and 4-back against 2-back and 2-back after two hours) the light failed and we decided to peg it down.  My balls were out of sight (note, this is not the same as being wired) somewhere on the lawn, so David shot at his partner ball which was in corner III but missed.  I then shot at his two balls, which were technically a double although again out of sight, safe in the knowledge that if I missed it would facilitate pegging down.  Pegging down wasn’t very difficult.

We were both a bit apprehensive about having to report to the manager the next morning that we had not completed our first round game, but David secretly admitted that he liked to have a pegged-down game as a little filler for the weekend.  The year before it had kept him and George Anderson going all weekend, with three attempts being necessary to finish the game.  I decided to let him explain to the manager.

Act I

The Saturday was a fine day and my first match was against John Surgenor.  I don’t remember much about the game except that I won; this was mainly due to plucking my cubic centimetre of chance, or being in the right place at the right time when John produced his duff game for the season.  We managed four rounds on the Saturday, and, after my first game against John, I was subsequently drubbed by everyone else.  I don’t remember much about these games, except the order they happened in, and that Corla was playing so well that she appeared to create a four ball break and take it to 4-back, in turn three.  This was the first game that Corla had won, and I was beginning to feel firmly established at the bottom of the heap.  Rod Williams, after five rounds, had five wins and I suppose he was feeling pretty good.  Sucks.

As you may have gathered I wasn’t doing a lot on the Saturday, and while everyone else was pegging out, I was making frequent trips to the wee shop (this is known as pigging out). As some of you will be aware, the owners are true purveyors of traditional Scottish cuisine: if you turn up wearing whites they will, without prompting, fry your egg for a good thirty minutes to ensure no little surprises come squirting out – most considerate.  David Warhurst, meanwhile, was proffering mousse sandwiches, which I had of course to accept just to show there was no ill feeling.  A mousse (sic) sandwich would have been quite a rarity in itself, but, help ma boab!, this was a moose (sic) sandwich.  These globetrotters make me sick (sic).  Look out for David wearing the spoils of Disneyland; personally I think they are a bit Mickey Mouse (sic).

Act II

On Sunday we had all managed to get played in, and the general standard of play had improved to a respectable level.  Rod’s lead had been whittled away by John and David and it was still anybody’s Rosebowl, though Rod (our Chairman) no doubt felt it had his name on it.  David and I had our pegged-down game to finish, so we wheeled it out that evening when the others had gone.  David took one ball from 2-back to the peg, and then I took my 1-back ball to the basket taking David’s ball with it and managing the 4-back peel on the way.  That left David on 2-back and me on penult and I had taken hoop position, but it had gone very dark again by this time.  David hit the lift shot from B-baulk, getting a rush to 2-back.  I couldn’t see what happened next but I suspect that David, in a brainstorm, tried to finish in that turn with a two-ball straight double peel.  This must have been almost completely successful, because the next thing I knew I was on the lawn and there were two balls each for peg and each within three yards of the peg.  The question was: which was mine?  It would have been unsportsmanlike to go for a torch, so I took the 50:50 chance, and lighting the post-match cigarette revealed I had got it right – +1.  David and I adjourned to Hielan Jessie’s, where our respective gases were put at a peep when, having sat down beside two charming elderly female denizens of the East End, explaining that we were not cricket players but not croquet players, one of them turned to the other and, with one word, summed us up.  English!

Act III

On the Monday we had the last two rounds to play, and when we had done that Rod and David were equal on seven games each.  Now the fact that we had fitted in four rounds on the Saturday became crucial, as it enabled us to have a play off.  This might not have suited David, as his three losses had been by 1, 2 and 3, but it provided a satisfactory conclusion to the series, as he lost by 4, so keeping his record of never having been worse than second but never actually better than second in this event.  For Rod it was a well deserved second win, due in no small measure to his two triples over John.  David had a purple patch on the Sunday, completing triples in successive games.  Rod, John and David decided that they had all played so well that they reduced each other’s handicap to ½, and we all went off to the pub for an orgy of self-congratulation.

21 – 23 September, 1991 at Glasgow Green:

(Report by David Appleton)

Why Glasgow’s Green

There was only one change from last year in the players invited to compete for the Chairman’s Rosebowl, Colin Rogers replacing David Warhurst.  This meant that five of the six players lived in Glasgow, so the event was switched there from Bush.  Would Rod Williams retain his title; would it revert to John Surgenor who had won it so often before; would David Appleton improve on the runner-up position he had occupied for the previous three years?  Or would it be the turn of the slightly less fancied players: could Colin win on his debut; could Malcolm O’Connell, now only one handicap point behind John and Rod, make an impression; or could Corla combine managing the weekend with winning?

Well, I won’t try to build up the tension: Rod repeated his success by playing the lost consistent croquet in miserable conditions.  On the Saturday the match at Hampden was abandoned at half-time because of torrential rain, but football referees are wimps compared to croquet managers: out came mallets and rakes to sweep away the puddles and we completed the required three matches each.  Thank goodness we could sit in our cars when we weren’t on the lawns, but I must confess I was pretty miserable by the time the day’s proceedings were over; I really envied Malcolm his white wellies, but I don’t suppose they would have helped my toothache.  One of the papers the following morning called it the sort of day that made Noah famous.

On the Sunday we started at 8:30, ostensibly to avoid the traffic associated with the Great Scottish Run.  I have played that early before, in Florida, where the temperature was already in the 70s; it wasn’t quite like that at Glasgow Green.  Still, here was a ray of sunshine: Corla had stuck in hoop 2 off my ball and the other two balls were about a foot apart at hoop 3; the lawns, for all the water they were holding, were playing well, so surely I could fashion a break out of this.  I made the roquet and took off to the balls at my hoop, then realised I had made the roquet with Corla’s ball.  Oh, bother!  The easy pace of the lawns should have made breaks easy, and indeed there were quite a lot of good ones, but the hoops were tight, with less than one-sixteenth of an inch clearance, so no-one could afford to be careless.  John, not for the first time, had done more work than anyone else in setting the hoops and laying out the lawns.

We all got at least four games played on the Sunday, and Rod and Malcolm managed five to make up for not having had the opportunity to play their first round match before the weekend.  Rod won four of his to take his tally to seven out of eight, in spite of crowd support for Malcolm in their two encounters.  (Yes, there was a crowd: I think five people came to view the proceedings over the three days, and they say three’s a crowd.)  When play began on Monday (again at 8:30, this time to avoid the rush hour apparently) there were therefore only two rounds to go.  If Rod beat John he kept his trophy, but John doesn’t give up that easily.  He is more inventive and less dour than he used to be, and indeed was probably the most fun to watch, but he still isn’t easy to beat, as Rod found.  So, going into the last round, Rod needed to beat Corla, which he had failed to do at the first attempt, and, if he lost, John could force a play off by beating David.  David was having a better morning, having beaten Colin not only at croquet but also in the silly hat stakes.  Colin was making a good attempt to look like a Belisha beacon, easily outclassing Rod’s tammy (in spite of its detachable bobble), but David produced a woolly hat with a tassel at least six inches long to take the title easily.  Inspired by that, and by the rain stopping long enough for folding chairs to appear, he then beat John, but Rod had already beaten Corla, so it was all a bit academic.  It was all over by just after 1 o’clock which surely means that, with the standard of play as it is, it isn’t necessary to play the first round before the Saturday, or to get into the habit of starting quite so early, even allowing for the possibility of a play off.

How can one sum up?  Compared to last year the event was disappointing.  There were no triples at all, though David did the three peels, only to miss the peg out by a whisker.  Perhaps you need a bit more joie de vivre than was in evidence, as well as some savoir faire to complete them, and even Rod, fresh from a trip to France, couldn’t achieve his first of the season.  There was one shot worth recording: Colin had all the balls round 4-back and was hampered by the hoop from hitting any of them, so under the vigilant eye of a referee, he played his ball onto a wire and succeeded in rebounding onto his target for a roquet.  Clever stuff.  Colin, in fact, had a satisfactory debut, consolidating his performance in the Masters; Malcolm recorded the same number of wins as the previous year, and Corla dropped to sixth, though her out-of-form shooting improved as the tournament progressed.  Over the last four years Rod and John have each won 26 games and taken the Rosebowl twice; David has won 25 and been runner-up, or joint second, on each occasion.  The Williams may start in pole position next year, but I’ll knock Rod off his perch yet.

1992:

No report has been found.  Rod Williams won with 8 games, John Surgenor had 7, Jeremy Dyer 6 with two triples, Mike Ranshaw 4, Colin Rogers 3 with one triple, and perennial runner-up David Appleton managed just two.

25 – 27 September, 1993 at Bush:

(Report by David Appleton)

Ten out of Ten for John

This year’s Chairman’s Rosebowl was dominated by John Surgenor.  The previous weekend he had regained the Scottish Open Championship from Jeremy Dyer, and he continued in the same unstoppable form to win all ten of his games and recover the trophy which he had last held from 1986 to 1989.  This appears to be the first time anybody has won all his games in this event (in fact, Ian Wright had won all ten in the third running of the event, back in 1980) and it is a measure of John’s present form.  Rod Williams, who has been in relatively poor form since returning from the French Open – possibly stunned by the quality of play he saw there, including five sextuples in seven attempts by Robert Fulford, who also added several triples, but more likely as a result of straining his wrist – never really looked like taking the title for a fourth successive year, and it was left to Jeremy to mount the main challenge.  Indeed he twice beat everyone except John and was a clear second.  Malcolm O’Connell had a good tournament to finish third, and came very close to beating both John and Jeremy.  Mike Ranshaw and David Appleton jointly brought up the rear, the former probably through playing too conservatively and not pressurising his opponents, and the latter because of a continuing inability to hit five yard roquets and run nine inch hoops which has seen his handicap rise from scratch to two in fifteen months.

Negative Play

The most significant handicap change, however, is John’s.  During the course of the weekend, he became a ‘minus player’, as far as we know the first home-based Scot to achieve this distinction.  In view of his results this year, particularly in the Home Internationals, this is richly deserved.  The weather could have been the best ever for this event – three days of beautiful sunshine – and the lawns were as usual splendid, though the early morning dew did show up some fairly pronounced curves on shots, not all of which could surely be attributed to spin imparted by the mallet.  Sadly the incidence of triple peels, or even attempts, has declined from its peak in 1991, so there was limited interest in watching many of the games except, as always, those in which a ball has been pegged out.

My personal thanks go to my opponents for an enjoyable tournament which will be my last in Scotland for some time as I shall be in Australia from the beginning of next season until it is almost over.  I shall enjoy reading reports on those that I miss; I just hope someone is willing to write them.

1994:

Once again there was little opposition for John Surgenor, though at least he had some new opponents, with Colin Dinwoodie, Andy Campbell and Alastair Hunter playing in their first Chairman’s.  Mike Ranshaw was second and Malcolm O’Connell third.  In the absence of a report on the premier Scottish invitation event what more can we say?

1995:

There was no tournament this year, apparently because there were too few players available on the allotted weekend.

1996:

(Report by Bruce Rannie)

(Bulletin 59, page 1 summary):

Rod Williams won the Chairman’s Rosebowl at Bush, pipping Brian Murdoch after three days and ten rounds of cut-throat croquet competition.  Despite the absence of John Surgenor and Malcolm O’Connell at Southport, and Jeremy Dyer, domiciled elsewhere now, the standard of play was probably higher than expected, although the nearest anybody got to a triple (even interrupted) was the first two peels by Charlotte Townsend.  (I don’t count Rod’s several attempts at TP, QP or any other kind of P, and as for Bruce Rannie’s wee shottie at TPO, well, no wonder Brian came second!)  The result was in doubt up to Round Ten, and even third place was being decided then, making all three games in that round meaningful.

(Full story):

Six good persons and true took up the Chairman’s Invitation to participate in a three day joust for his Rosebowl at Bush, with ten rounds of advanced tilting to be crammed into hours of daylight and so on.  One Rod Williams was favourite, with Brian Murdoch hitting a purple streak, David Appleton wondering what has gone wrong between brain and lawn, Bruce Rannie looking to double his year’s competitive tally, Charlotte Townsend looking to maintain the year’s consistency, and Nigel Gardner phoning home ‘Yes, it’s the Chairman’s, see you on Tuesday!’

‘Act One Was When We Met’

Day One was cold, damp, miserable (not the people, not the croquet), as we tried to get three and a half rounds in, with two and a half hour time limits.  Round One gave Rod 26 over Nigel, Brian 17 over Bruce and Charlotte a struggled 3T over David.  Round Two saw Nigel’s first point, but Bruce running hoop 5 and hoop 6 after time to pinch it, Brian getting a second 17 over David and Charlotte getting within four of Rod.  Round Three gave wins to Rod and Brian again, with players determined not to break down, because that meant tent duty.  During all this canvassing, Nigel crept to his first win, over David.  Round Four was notable for the drama unseen by all, including the players (why does everybody play properly in the dark?), as Charlotte pegged out, and Bruce and David kept saying ‘the next turn will win this’ – it didn’t, but Bruce again pinched it on time.  Rod had beaten Brian as dusk fell.

‘Then Came Act Two, You Acted Strange’

Day Two was slightly drier, not much warmer, apart from maybe an hour in the afternoon.  Round Five saw three hammerings to begin the day, Charlotte over Bruce (she’s much better when she’s angry!), Rod over David and Brian over Nigel, so the pattern was there at half-time.  Round Six nearly brought some unexpected results as Nigel niggled Rod right up to the end, Bruce started a TPO against Brian but got nowhere near and lost the innings and the game, and David got some form back but still got done by Charlotte.

Round Seven saw Rod steamroller Charlotte, Bruce have everything work against Nigel, and David and Brian have a ‘proper’ game, with breaks and leaves and lifts, which David finally won, making Rod a clear favourite at this point.  A gaggle of referees (how many referees make five?) caused chaos for miles around – double bankers?!!  There was plenty of time for Round Eight to be completed in daylight.  Bruce had the temerity to give Rod contact (‘make him think!’), Rod pegged Bruce’s ball out, then Bruce fluffed one good chance and never troubled the scorer again. Charlotte did not take croquet against Brian and David got his revenge over Nigel.  So at the end of two days, totals were totted up, possibilities considered, and Rod could still be caught.

‘They Can Bring The Curtain Down’

Day Three was much warmer, more leisurely, and we actually stopped for lunch.  Brian had to beat Rod, or rely on other results.  After a tense game with good croquet most of the time, Brian got ahead by one as time was called, but missed the chance to go to the peg.  Rod was in, but 1-back proved fatal and it was still possible for Brian to win the title.  Bruce beat David and Charlotte beat Nigel, meaning that third place was still open too.

Round Ten’s games were all meaningful – if David beat Rod and Rod scored less than seven, and Brian beat Nigel and Nigel did not score, Brian would win!  And if Bruce beat Charlotte by ten he would pinch third place.

But… Rod ground David down, clinching the Rosebowl, although Brian got his win over Nigel.  And Bruce got the 14 he needed.  Brian came down to 3½ after Day One, and 3 after Day Three – Nigel went up to 6 after his losses, sand Charlotte was prevented from going to 4½ yet by that final loss.

David presented the Rosebowl to Rod, nobody had a camera, the tent vanished as did the sunshine, and we all went home!  Thanks to George for organising us, and even cycling to see the finish, and let’s see who’s available next year!

1997:

Malcolm O’Connell, with nine wins out of ten, won the Chairman’s Rosebowl at Kelvingrove, Glasgow, in September.  Rod Williams, with seven wins, came second in the annual invitation event in which the best six available SCA players cram ten advanced level games into three days.  Brian Murdoch (6), Bruce Rannie (3), Charlotte Townsend (3) and Su Stenhouse (2) were the other participants.

1998:

No report has been found.  Winner: Malcolm O’Connell (8).  Others: John Surgenor (7), Rod Williams (5), Andy Campbell (4), Brian Murdoch (3) and Brian Durward (3).

18 – 20 September, 1999 at Kelvingrove:

(Report by Rod Williams)

For the first time for some years players were queuing up to be selected for the Chairman’s Rosebowl and the Malmet Cup, the invitation events for the top six and the next six available players in Scotland.

Players selected for the Chairman’s were (in alphabetical order) David Appleton, Andy Campbell, Brian Murdoch, Malcolm O’Connell, John Surgenor and Rod Williams.

There were no TPs at all, surprisingly, considering Malcolm’s dominance and recent form – lots of TPFs though!  Perhaps Malky’s regular order for ‘roll’n’sausage with brown sauce and a tea with milk and two sugars unless they don’t stir it in which case it’s three’ wasn’t prepared properly. Malcolm won with nine wins.

Andy played solidly to come second with six wins, including one against Malcolm, hitting accurately and seldom breaking down.

Five rounds were played on day 1, meaning that heavy rain on Monday did not prevent many games being played, although one game, which David Appleton and Andy Campbell had agreed they would play at Bush that day, was not played thanks to the flooded lawns at Bush.

It’s encouraging for Scottish croquet that the standard of play of Scotland’s ‘second string’ players has improved to the extent that they are now a serious threat to the leading players.

2000:

No report has been found.  Winner: Jonathan Kirby (7), with John Surgenor (4), Rod Williams (3), David Appleton (3), Brian Murdoch (1).  The second matches between Jonathan Kirby and John Surgenor, and Rod Williams and Brian Murdoch were abandoned because of waterlogging.  Dave Arnot had been invited to play, but could not because he was ill.

2001:

No report was published.  Winner:  Rod Williams (7), with Bruce Rannie (6) David Appleton (5), Charlotte Townsend (5), Dave Arnot (4) and Campbell Morrison (3).

2002:

No report has been found.  Winner: Jonathan Kirby (10 with 7 TPs), with John Surgenor (7 with 1 TP), Bruce Rannie (7 – the three lost were all to TPs), Rod Williams (3), Fergus McInnes (2) and Campbell Morrison (1).

2003:

This report is already on the website.

2004:

This report is already on the website.

2005:

This report is already on the website.  However, it incorporates the Malmet and may have to be split, depending on what the reference system is.

2006:

This report is already on the website.  However, it incorporates the Malmet and may have to be split, depending on what the reference system is.

2007:

This report is already on the website.  However, it incorporates the Malmet and may have to be split, depending on what the reference system is.

2008: 

No report has been found.  Bruce Rannie won all 10, with the last including SXPO on James Hopgood.  Others were James Hopgood 6, Martin Stephenson 6, Brian Murdoch 5, David Appleton 2 and Fergus McInnes 1.

2009:

No report has been found.  James Hopgood won 8, with Brian Murdoch 6, Martin Stephenson 6, Malcolm O’Connell 5, Alan Wilson 5 and Bill Spalding 0.

2010:

This report is already on the website.  However, it incorporates the Malmet and may have to be split, depending on what the reference system is.

2011:

This report is already on the website.  However, it incorporates the Malmet and may have to be split, depending on what the reference system is.

2012:

This report is already on the website.  However, it incorporates the Malmet and may have to be split, depending on what the reference system is.

 

Results:

1978:     No records have been found
Stephen Wright won, Dave Nichols, Bob Maclean, Rod Williams, Stuart Malin, Jim White in that order

1979:    

 

RM

WS

FN

EM

IW

RW

Wins

Bob Maclean

 

+7, -9

-6, -17

+7, +4

+9, +13

+12, +10

7

Bill Spalding

-7, +9

 

+8, +15

-5, -26

+15, +21

+1, +5

7

Jack Norton

+6, +17

-8, -15

 

-4, +5

-5, +20

+12, +9

6

Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie

-7, -4

+5, +26

+4, -5

 

-23, +5

+13, +14

6

Ian Wright

-9, -13

-15, -21

+5, -20

+23, -5

 

+26, +10

4

Rod Williams

-12, -10

-1, -5

-12, -9

-13, -14

-26, -10

 

0

Bob Maclean beat Bill Spalding +12 in the play-off.

1980:

 

IW

WS

CR

SM

ML

RC

Wins

Ian Wright

 

+4, +16

+5, +12

+26, +26

+20, +4

+21, +21

10

Bill Spalding

-4, -16

 

-5, +6

+22, +15

+13, +25

+8, +20

7

Carol Rowe

-5, -12

+5, -6

 

-15, -1

+9, +14

+19, +18

5

Stuart Malin

-26, -26

-22, -15

+15, +1

 

-9, -6

+4, +21

4

Margaret Lauder

-20, -4

-13, -25

-9, -14

+9, +6

 

-11, -4

2

Robert Calder

-21, -21

-8, -20

-19, -18

-4, -21

+11, +4

 

2

1981:    

 

WMS

EMB

RW

ML

CAR

MPWS

Wins

Bill Spalding

 

-24, +20

+8, +14

+3, +15

+9, +20

+26, +18

9

Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie

+24, -20

 

+25, -23

+18, +19

+1, +25

+15, +14

8

Rod Williams

-8, -14

-25, +23

 

+20, +18

-9, +19

-9, +16

5

Margaret Lauder

-3, -15

-18, -19

-20, -18

 

+16, +9

+3, +9

4

Carol Rowe

-9, -20

-1, -25

+9, -19

-16, -9

 

+15, -9

2

Malcolm Smith

-26, -18

-15, -14

+9, -16

-3, -9

-15, +9

 

2

1982:     SCA Bulletin 26 (February 1983) includes the report of the tournament but no comprehensive set of game scores, or who beat whom
Bill Spalding 9 wins, beat Alasdair Adam +16, Stuart Malin twice, Alastair Hunter twice, Ian Wright twice, Carol Rowe twice
Alasdair Adam 8 wins, beat Bill Spalding +4, Stuart Malin, Alastair Hunter twice, Ian Wright twice, Carol Rowe twice
Stuart Malin 5 wins, beat Alasdair Adam +5, four other games
Alastair Hunter 3 wins
Ian Wright 3 wins
Carol Rowe 2 wins

1983:     No records have been found
Five players only
Bill Spalding 6 wins, Nick Hyne 5, Rod Williams 4, Jack Norton 3, Alasdair Adam 2

1984:    

 

RW

WMS

FVXN

GGS

JS

AGMH

Wins

Rod Williams

 

+26, -17

+1, -18

+10, +5

+5, +12

+23, +9

8

Bill Spalding

-26, +17

 

-10, +8

+12, +4

-6, +5

+7, +12

7

Jack Norton

-1, +18

+10, -8

 

+12, -15

+11, +19

-22, -3

5

Geoff Strutt

-10, -5

-12, -4

-12, +15

 

+2, -15

+11, +12

4

John Surgenor

-5, -12

+6, -5

-11, -19

-2, +15

 

+4, +2

4

Alastair Hunter

-23, -9

-7, -12

+22, +3

-11, -12

-4, -2

 

2

1985:    

 

WMS

RW

EMB

IHW

FVXN

GA

Wins

Bill Spalding

 

-4, +11

+2, +10

+14, +6

+21, +12

+20, +17

9

Rod Williams

+4, -11

 

+15, +14

+14, +4

+10, +12

+13, +23

9

Ewen Mackenzie-Bowie

-2, -10

-15, -14

 

-4, +23

+12, +13

+23, +13

5

Ian Wright

-14, -6

-14, -4

+4, -22

 

+23, -9

+19, +9

4

Jack Norton

-21, -12

-10, -12

-12, -13

-23, +9

 

+9, +10

3

George Anderson

-20, -17

-13, -23

-23, -13

-19, -9

-9, -10

 

0

1986:    

 

JS

RW

IHW

MPWS

GA

FVXN

Wins

John Surgenor

 

-10, +23

+13, +17

+12, +14

+8, +15

+8, +15

9

Rod Williams

+10, -23

 

+19, -14

+18, +3

+6, +9

+26, +9

8

Ian Wright

-13, -17

-19, +14

 

+20, +19

_3, +3

+14, -7

6

Malcolm Smith

-12, -14

-18, -3

-20, -19

 

+5, +5

+9, +7

2

George Anderson

-8, -15

-6, -9

-3, -3

-5, -5

 

+18, +2

2

Jack Norton

-8, -15

-26, -9

-14, +7

-9, -7

-18, -2

 

1

1987:    

 

JS

GA

DW

RW

AA

CvG

Wins

John Surgenor

 

-2T, -19

+3, +3T

+18, +9

+20, +1T

+17, +15

8

George Anderson

+2T, +19

 

+1T, -5T

-5, +15

+11T, -10T

+11T, -15

6

David Warhurst

-3, -3T

-1T, +5T

 

+20, +14T

+1T, -24

+7, -11

5

Rod Williams

-18, -9

+5, -15

-20, -14T

 

-3T, +13

+18, +4

4

Alasdair Adam

-20, -1T

-11T, +10T

-1T, +24

+3T, -13

 

+1T, -23

4

Corla van Griethuysen

-17, -15

-11T, +15

-7, +11

-18, -4

-1T, +23

 

3

1988:     No records have been found
John Surgenor 7 wins, Rod Williams 6, David Appleton 6, Corla van Griethuysen 5, George Anderson 3, Ian Wright 1

1989:    

 

JS

DA

MG

RW

CvG

GA

Wins

John Surgenor

 

-4, +8

+7, +23

-24, +16

+5, -7T

+21, +17

7

David Appleton

+4, -8

 

+22, +13

-10, +14

-5, +2

-14, +24

6

Martin Gill

-7, -23

-22, -13

 

+2T, +16

+2T, +8

+3T, +4

6

Rod Williams

+24, -16

+10, -14

-2T, -16

 

+19, -10

+25tp, +8

5

Corla van Griethuysen

-5, +7T

+5, -2

-2T, -8

-19, +10

 

+1T, +2

5

George Anderson

-21, -17

+14, -24

-3T, -4

-25, -8

-1T, -2

 

1

1990:    

 

RW

DA

JS

CvG

MO’C

DW

Wins

Rod Williams

 

+3, -26

+2tp, +11tp

+17, -21

+15, -8

+9, +24

7

David Appleton

-3, +26tp

 

-2, +23

+15, +12

-1, +23

+4tp, +15

7

John Surgenor

-2, -11

+2, -23

 

+26, +26

-5, +2

+26, +1

6

Corla van Griethuysen

-17, +21

-15, -12

-26, -26

 

+22, +2

-14, +13

4

Malcolm O’Connell

-15, +8

+1, -23

+5, -2

-22, -2

 

-7, +5

4

David Warhurst

-9, -24

-4, -15

-26, -1

+14, -13

+7, -5

 

2

Rod Williams beat David Appleton +4 in the play-off.

1991:     No records have been found
Rod Williams 8 wins, David Appleton 6, John Surgenor 6, Colin Rogers 6, Malcolm O’Connell 4, Corla van Griethuysen 2

1992:    

 

RW

JS

JD

MR

CR

DA

Wins

Rod Williams

 

-9, +3

+17, -26

+25, +10

+26, +20

+5, +22

8

John Surgenor

+9, -3

 

+18, +7

+24, -22

-9, +25

+24, +5

7

Jeremy Dyer

-17, +26tp

-18, -7

 

+26tp, -3

+9, +4

+24, +26

6

Mike Ranshaw

-25, -10

-24, +22

-26, +3

 

+6, -17

-7, +26

4

Colin Rogers

-26, -20

+9, -25

-9, -4

-6, +17

 

-20, +25tp

3

David Appleton

-5, -22

-24, -5

-24, -26

+7, -26

+20, -26

 

2

1993:    

 

JS

JD

MO’C

RW

MR

DA

Wins

John Surgenor

 

+25, +9

+26, +4

+25, +18

+20, +25

+12, +26

10

Jeremy Dyer

-25, -9

 

+14, +3

+12, +17

+10, +24

+25, +20

8

Malcolm O’Connell

-26, -4

-14, -3

 

+15, +15

-17, +1

+21, +7

5

Rod Williams

-25, -18

-12, -17

-15, -15

 

+14, +15

+23, -8

3

Mike Ranshaw

-20, -25

-10, -24

+17, -1

-14, -15

 

+4, -8

2

David Appleton

-12, -26

-25, -20

-21, -7

-23, +8

-4, +8

 

2

1994:    

 

JS

MR

MO’C

CD

AC

AH

Wins

John Surgenor

 

+22, +23

+25, -10

+5, +7

+25, +13

+18, +12

9

Mike Ranshaw

-22, -23

 

+7, +2T

+4T, +8T

-11T, +1T

+1T

6

Malcolm O’Connell

-25, +10

-7T, -2T

 

-26, +4

+13, +20

+26, +21

6

Colin Dinwoodie

-5, -7

-4T, -8T

+26, -4

 

+4T

+17, +17

4

Andy Campbell

-25, -13

+11T, -1T

-13, -20

-4T

 

+14, +2T

3

Alastair Hunter

-18, -12

-1T

-26, -21

-17, -17

-14, -2T

 

0

1995:  No tournament

1996:    

 

RW

BM

BR

CT

DA

NG

Wins

Rod Williams

 

+19, -1T

+9, +13

+19, +25

+17, +20

+26, +5T

9

Brian Murdoch

-19, +1T

 

+17, +18

+17, +26

+17, -6

+16, +25

8

Bruce Rannie

-9, -13

-17, -18

 

-25, +14

+1T, +5T

+1T, +24

5

Charlotte Townsend

-19, -25

-17, -26

+25, -14

 

+3T, +5

+11, +11

5

David Appleton

-17, -20

-17, +6

-1T, -5T

-3T, -5

 

-1T, +16

2

Nigel Gardner

-26, -5

-16, -25

-1T, -24

-11, -11

+1T, -16

 

1

1997:

 

MO

RW

BM

BR

CT

SS

Wins

Malcolm O’Connell

 

+10, -10

+12,
+12T

+19,
+16

+2T,
+11

+19tp,
+10

9

Rod Williams

-10, +10

 

+24, -26

+7, +25

+21,
-1T

+7, +20

7

Brian Murdoch

-12,
-12T

-24, +26

 

+8, +18

+19,
+10

-7T, +2T

6

Bruce Rannie

-19, -16

-7, -25

-8, -18

 

+10,
+2T

+23, -18

3

Charlotte Townsend

-2T, -11

-21, +1T

-19, -10

-10, -2T

 

+7T, +6T

3

Su Stenhouse

-19, -10

-7, -20

+7T,
-2T

-23, +18

-7T, -6T

 

2

1998:

 

MO

JS

RW

AC

BM

BD

Wins

Malcolm O’Connell

 

+1T,
+24tp

+17tp,
-3

+4,+14

-2T,+2T

+4T,+16

8

John Surgenor

-1T,-24

 

-16,+5

+15,+26

+22,+13

+10,+25

7

Rod Williams

-17,+3

16,-5

 

+19,-13

+15,-6T

-14,+17

5

Andy Campbell

-4,-14

-15,-26

-19,+13

 

+11,+24

-5T,+14

4

Brian Murdoch

+2T,-2T

-22,-13

-15,+6T

-11,-24

 

-1T,+8T

3

Brian Durward

-4T,-16

-10,-25

+14,-17

+5T,-14

+1T,-8T

 

3

1999:

 

MO

AC

JS

BM

DA

RW

Wins

Malcolm O’Connell

 

+11,-20

+1,+24

+18,+26

+24,+25

+17,+10

9

Andy Campbell

-11,+20

 

+23,-16

+14,-1

+3

+16,+26

6

John Surgenor

-1,-24

-23,+16

 

+23,-3

+26,-26

+13,+5

5

Brian Murdoch

-18,-26

-14,+1

-23,+3

 

+3,-15

+12,-18

4

David Appleton

-24,-25

-3

-26,+26

-3,+15

 

+3,-16

3

Rod Williams

-17,-10

-16,-26

-13,-5

-12,+18

-3,+16

 

2

2000:

 

PJK

JS

RW

DA

BM

Wins

Jonathan Kirby

 

+7

+15,+11

+13. +26

+17, +4

7

John Surgenor

-7

 

+24, -4

+15, -17

+3, +12

4

Rod Williams

-15, -11

-24, +4

 

-15, +5

+3

3

David Appleton

-13, -26

-15, +17

+15, -5

 

+20, -15

3

Brian Murdoch

-17, -4

-3, -12

-3

-20, +15

 

1

The second matches between Jonathan Kirby and John Surgenor, and Rod Williams and Brian Murdoch were abandoned because of waterlogging.  Dave Arnot had been invited to play, but could not because he was ill.

2001:

 

RW

BR

DRA

CT

DPA

CM

Wins

Rod Williams

 

-17, -25

+1T, +1

+14stp,
-3T

+26, +17

+18, 26

7

Bruce Rannie

+17, +25

 

-23, +26

-10, -26

-17, +3

+13, +20

6

David Appleton

-1T, -1

+23,
-26

 

+7, +15

+19, -4

+2tp, -17

5

Charlotte Townsend

-14, +3T

+10, +26

-7, -15

 

+2T, +15

-24, -23T

5

Dave Arnot

-26, -17

+17, -3

-19, +4

-2t, -15

 

+19, +24

4

Campbell Morrison

-18, -26

-13, -20

-2, +17

+24, +23T

-19, -24

 

3

2002:

 

JK

JS

BR

RW

FM

CM

Wins

Jonathan Kirby

 

+16tp, +16

+25tp, +26tp

+3, +15tp

+23tp, +23tp

+18, +19tp

10

John Surgenor

-16, -16

 

+23tp,
-5

+25, +18

+26, +10

+20, +13

7

Bruce Rannie

-25, -26

-23, +5

 

+20, +24

+11, +23

+23, +13

7

Rod Williams

-3, -15

-25, -18

-20, -24

 

+18, -15

+26, +4

3

Fergus McInnes

-23, -23

-26, -10

-11, -23

-18, +15

 

+8T, -15

2

Campbell Morrison

-18, -19

-20, -13

-23, -13

-26, -4

-8T, +15

 

1

2003:

 

JS

BM

BR

RW

DRA

DPA

Wins

John Surgenor

 

+21, +13

+4, +12

-5, -1

+2, -19

+2, +14

7

Brian Murdoch

-21, -13

 

-11, +9

+17, +12

+9, +9

+12, +14

7

Bruce Rannie

-4, -12

+11, -9

 

+4, -5

+23, +19

+13, +9

6

Rod Williams

+5, +1

-17, -12

-4, +5

 

+21, -5

+19, +4

6

David Appleton

-2, +19tp

-9, -9

-23, -19

-21, +5

 

-17, +14

3

Dave Arnot

-2, -14

-12, -14

-13, -9

-19, -4

+17, -14

 

1

2004:

 

RWW

JS

BRPM

ACT

DRA

AAW

Wins

Rod Williams

 

+26, -25tp

+15, +14

+14, +1T

+8, +23

+21, +25

9

John Surgenor

-26, +25tp

 

+4T, -21

+26tp, -7

+20, +4

+6, +25

7

Brian Murdoch

-15, -14

-4T, +21

 

-8T, +25

+22, -16tp

+17, +9

5

Tony Brightman

-14, -1T

-26tp, +7

+8T, -25

 

-22, +14

+7T, -12T

4

David Appleton

-8, -23

-20, -4

-22, +16tp

+22, -14

 

+3T, -16

3

Alan Wilson

-21, -25

-6, -25

-17, -9

-7T, +12T

-3T, +16

 

2

2005:

 

FRM

DRA

MAS

CMT

JW

MOC

Wins

Fergus McInnes

 

+12, -7

+21, +10

+11T, +26

+26, +17

+26, +3T

9

David Appleton

-12, +7

 

-15, +26

+18, +14

+23, +14

+16, +13

8

Martin Stephenson

-21, -10

+15, -26

 

+16, +15

-9, +1T

-11, +15

5

Charlotte Townsend

-11T, -26

-18, -14

-16, -15

 

+25, +12T

+12, +10

4

Jamieson Walker

-26, -17

-23, -14

+9, -1T

-25, -12T

 

+11T, +4T

3

Malcolm O’Connell

-26, -3T

-16, -13

+11, -15

-12, -10

-11T, -4T

 

1

2006:

 

DRA

MAS

RWW

JRH

FRM

BCS

Wins

David Appleton

 

-16, +18

-4, -17

+24, -5

+26, +20

+10, +15

6

Martin Stephenson

+16, -18

 

-4T, +14

+5T, +19

+10, -1T

-6, +3T

6

Rod Williams

+4, +17

+4T, -14

 

-10T, -1T

-4T, +9

+16, +12

6

James Hopgood

-24, +5

-5T, -19

+10T, +1T

 

-7, +17

+22, +11

6

Fergus McInnes

-26, -20

-10, +1T

+4T, -9

+7, -17

 

+19, +16

5

Brian Sykes

-10, -15

+6, -3T

-16, -12

-22, -11

-19, -16

 

1

2007:

2nd round 18-pt games

DRA

JRH

FRMcI

MAS

RAH

TF

Wins

David Appleton

 

-5T, -10

+6, +9

+24, +6

+17, +9

+7T, +16

8

James Hopgood

+5T, +10

 

+3T, +3

-26, +1

+20, +1T

+18, -1T

8

Fergus McInnes

-6, -9

-3T, -3

 

+16, +11

+7, +1T

-4T, +18

5

Martin Stephenson

-24, -6

+26tp, -1

-16, -11

 

+1T, -1

+25, +26

4

Allan Hawke

-17, -9

-20, -1T

-7, -1T

-1T, +1

 

+3T

2

Terry Foster

-7T, -16

-18, +1T

+4T, -18

-25, -16

-3T

 

1

The second game between Allan Hawke and Terry Foster did not take place.

2008:

 

BMR

JRH

MAS

BRPM

DRA

FMcI

Wins

Bruce Rannie

 

+14, +6sxpo

+10, +9

+15, +26tp

+15, +12otp

+15, +26

10

James Hopgood

-14, -6

 

+16, -26

+17tp,
-14

+23, +26tp

+1tp, +14

6

Martin Stephenson

-10, -9

-16, +26

 

+10, +11

-26, +16

+11, +4

6

Brian Murdoch

-15, -26

-17, +14

-10, -11

 

+8, +3T

+5, +25

5

David Appleton

-15,
-12(tpo)

-23, -26

+26tp,
-16

-8, -3T

 

+14tp,
-18

2

Fergus McInnes

-15, -26

-1, -14

-11, -4

-25, -5

-14, +18

 

1

2009:

 

JRH

BRPM

MAS

MO’C

AAW

WMS

Wins

James Hopgood

 

-17, +11

-16, +26tp

+6T, +17

-3, +8

+8T, +5tp

7

Brian Murdoch

+17tp,
-11

 

-21, +4

+2T, -3T

-1T, +9

+17, +14

6

Martin Stephenson

+16, -26

+21, -4

 

-8, +25

-14, +19

+23, +4T

6

Malcolm O’Connell

-6T, -17

-2T, +3T

+8, -25

 

+19, +1T

+10T

5

Alan Wilson

+3, -8

+1T, -9

+14, -19

-19, -1T

 

+14, +13

5

Bill Spalding

-8T, -5

-17, -14

-23, -4T

-10T

-14, -13

 

0

The second game between Malcolm O’Connell and Bill Spalding did not take place.

2010:

 

JRH

BRPM

MAS

AAW

JM

FMcI

Wins

James Hopgood

 

+26tp, +17tp

+26tp, +2tp

+22, +14

+9, +26tp

+26tp, +25tp

10

Brian Murdoch

-26, -17

 

-25, +23

+24, +1T

+10, +22

-7T, +17

6

Martin Stephenson

-26, -2

+25tp,
-23

 

+5T, +6T

+15, +26tp

-14, -15

5

Alan Wilson

-22, -14

-24, -1T

-5T, -6T

 

+13, -16

+3, +14

3

Jane Morrison

-9, -26

-10, -22

-15, -26

-13, +16

 

+25, +19

3

Fergus McInnes

-26, -25

+7T, -17

+14, +15

-3, -14

-25, -19

 

3

2011:

 

JRH

CIM

JM

BRS

MAS

AAW

Wins

James Hopgood

 

+26tp, +26tp

+25, +17

+26tp, +14tp

+25, +17tp

+6, +26tp

10

Campbell Morrison

-26, -26

 

+17, +15

+26tp, +26

+14, +12

+17, +16

8

Jane Morrison

-25, -17

-17, -15

 

+26, +7

+1T, +17

+25, +21

6

Bryan Sykes

-26, -14

-26, -26

-26, -7

 

+12, +17

+7T, +12

4

Martin Stephenson

-25, -17

-14, 12

-1T, -17

-12, -17

 

+21, +10T

2

Alan Wilson

-6, -26

-17, -16

-25, -21

-7T, -12

-21, -10T

 

0

2012:

 

JRH

JM

MAS

CIM

BRS

AAW

Wins

James Hopgood

 

+3, -26

+24t, +24tp

+10tpo, +26tp

+23, +15

+14tp, +26tp

9

Jane Morrison

-3, +26

 

-2T, +16

-4, +5T

+24, +16

-4T, +16

6

Martin Stephenson

-24, -24

+2T, -16

 

+16, +11tp

-14, +3

+1T, +10T

6

Campbell Morrison

-10, -26

+4, -5T

-16, -11

 

+20, +15

+12, +15

5

Bryan Sykes

-23, -15

-24, -16

+14, -3

-20, -15

 

+8T, +8

3

Alan Wilson

-14, -26

+4T, -16

-1T, -10T

-12, -15

-8T, -8

 

1